UNIVERSITY OF MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY

Department of Political Science and International Relations

Ancient Political Thought

Recommended Books

 

1. Earnest Barker, Greek Political Thought: Plato & Aristotle, London, 1964

2. G.H.Sabine, History of Political Thought, London, 1980

3. D.R. Bhandari, History of European Political Thought, New Delhi, 1962.

4. White, Stephen K. & Moon J. Donald, What is Political Theory? London: Sage Publications, 2004

5. Sinclair, Alistair J. What is Philosophy: An Introduction, Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press, 2008

6. Annas, Julia, Ancient Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction, London: OUP, 2000

7. Ebenstein, Williams. Great Political Thought: Plato to the Present, Illionis: Dryden Press, 1989

8. John Somerville and Ronald Santoni (eds.), Social and Political Philosophy: Readings from Plato to Gandhi, Anchor, 1963

9. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, Aristotle, Florence: Routledge, 1995

10. T. A. Sinclair, A History of Greek Political Thought, New York: Routledge, 2010

11. George T. Menake, Three Traditions of Greek Political Thought: Plato in Dialogue, Maryland:    United Press of America, 2004

 

 

Course Description

This course is designed to provide students grounding in evolution of Greek Political thought and institutions. The significance of this course is that Greek philosophy and institutions provided the basis for further development of the political studies.

Course Objectives

  1. To gain a general overview of the competing ideas on human nature, justice, rights, freedom, moral ontology, happiness that shaped the Western political tradition.
  2. To challenge students to demonstrate how every conception of government implies a view of human nature and destiny and that no adequate understanding of politics and its goals is possible without a systematic consideration of the essence of the human condition.
  3. To encourage students to think independently and critically. Through the question-and-answer process, students will develop their critical thinking skills by evaluating rationally the strengths and weaknesses of various competing moral systems and political options.
  4. To appreciate better the enduring significance of the ideas of the great political thinkers.
  5. To develop reading comprehension skills through a close textual analysis of selected works of the great political thinkers.

 

Teaching Method

 

The course will be based on interactive discussions and student centered learning activities through an emphasis on both active and cooperative learning. Periodical assessment and evaluation through quizzes, class tests, mid-term and final examinations will be part of the course.

 

Course Duration

 

The course work will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

 

Evaluation/ Grading

 

Final                                                                40%

Mid-term                                                         25%

Quiz                                                                10%

Presentation                                                    10%

Assignments                                                    10%

Collaboration Marks                                       05%

 

Course Policies

 

Failing to attend more than 6 sessions will result in automatic short attendance in the course. Punctuality and academic honesty are of the utmost importance as well. It is important that you get to class sharply on time, and stay for the entire class session.

 

 

Course Schedule

 

Week1- Introduction: What is Political Philosophy?

 

In this week, we will learn the significance of political philosophy. How political philosophies provide the discipline of political science with normative theories. We will connect this with the Philosophy in Greek society, particularly in the city state of Athens.

 

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. S. A. Palekar, “Analysis of Political Thought” in Western Political Thought (Jaipur: Global Media, 2008), 14-33

 

Week2- Political Institutions in Ancient Greek

 

We will discuss what type of political institutions existed in Athens and Greece in general. Why are they worth reading and what were the morals of that society at that time?

 

  1. B. E. Hammond, “Greek Political Institutions” in Political Institutions of the Ancient Greeks (The University of Michigan: C. G. Clay and Sons, 1895), 23-36
  2. Sarah B. Pomeroy and Stanley M. Burstein, “Early Greece and the Bronze Age” in Ancient Greece: A Political, Social and Cultural History (New York: OUP, 1999), 1-39

 

Week3- The Philosophy of Stoics and Epicureans

 

We will discover the basic premises of the philosophy of Stoics and Epicureans. In this week, we will understand their view on rationality.

 

  1. N. Jayapalan, “The Epicurean Philosophy and the Stoic Philosophy” in Comprehensive History of Political Thought (New Delhi: The Publishers, 2001), 41-50
  2. A. A. Long, “Epicurus and Epicureanism” in Hellenistic Philosophy: Stoics, Epicureans, Sceptics (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986), 14-74
  3. A. A. Long, “Stoicism” in Hellenistic Philosophy: Stoics, Epicureans, Sceptics (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986), 14-74

 

Week4- The Philosophy of Socrates (Examined Life, Method, Citizenship)

 

We will step into the world of famous philosopher called Socrates. In this regard, his method famously known as “Socratic Method” will be discussed.

 

  1. Thomas C. Brickhouse and Nicholas S. Smith, “Socratic Method” in Plato’s Socrates (New York: OUP, 1994) 1-29

 

 

Week5- Plato: Life from Politics to Philosophy

 

In this week, we shall explore the philosophy of Plato, who was a student of Socrates. He is believed to have brought the ideas of his teacher, Socrates, into writing.

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “ Plato” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 54-100
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Xenophon. Plato’s Politicus or Statesman” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 169-185
  3. George T. Menake, “Development of Plato’s Thought and His Early Dialogues as Prologue to the Republic” in Three Traditions of Greek Political Thought: Plato in Dialogue (Maryland: United Press of America, 2004) 243-284

 

 

 

Week6- Plato: The Best Political Order, the Quest for Justice

 

We will continue our debate on Plato’s theory. In this week, we shall step into the realm of political philosophy and how he advanced the idea of Socrates and formed a political lens. In this week, we shall also discuss Plato’s view on justice. In the end, we will critique his view.

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “ Plato” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 54-100
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Plato’s Laws” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 186-208
  3. George T. Menake, “Plato as Reformer: The Laws” in Three Traditions of Greek Political Thought: Plato in Dialogue (Maryland: United Press of America, 2004) 361-396

 

Week7- Plato: Politics and the Soul, the Government of Philosopher Rules

 

Plato’s view on the type of government will be discussed. This week would involve discussing in detail his idea of Philosopher’s King.

 

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “ Plato” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 54-100
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Plato’s Republic” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 143-168
  3. George T. Menake, “Plato as Prophet-Philosopher” in Three Traditions of Greek Political Thought: Plato in Dialogue (Maryland: United Press of America, 2004) 313-360

 

Week8- Mid-Term

 

Week9- Aristotle’s Science of Regime Politics

 

We shall discover how Aristotle brought rigor into the study of politics by making it less abstract and idealistic.

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “Aristotle” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 101-147
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Aristotle” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 209-238
  3. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, “Philosophy of Nature” in Aristotle (Florence: Routledge, 1995) 65-116

 

Week10- Aristotle’s View of Politics

 

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “Aristotle” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 101-147
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Aristotle” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 209-238
  3. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, “Politics” in Aristotle (Florence: Routledge, 1995) 195-243

Week11- Aristotle: Ethics and Politics

 

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “Aristotle” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 101-147
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Aristotle” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 209-238
  3. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, “Ethics” in Aristotle (Florence: Routledge, 1995) 244-279

 

 

Week12- Aristotle: Logic and Philosophy of Science, Metaphysics and Biology

 

  1. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, “Logic” in Aristotle (Florence: Routledge, 1995) 21-64
  2. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, “Metaphysics” in Aristotle (Florence: Routledge, 1995) 161-194

 

Week13- Roman Political Thought

 

  1. Judd Harmon, Political Thought (New York:1964),75-90

 

Week14- Presentations

 

 

 

Week15- Course Review

 

Week 16- Final Examination

 

 

  POL-498 Cyber Politics

 

Introduction:

This course is an analysis of how Information Technology in general and Cyberspace in particular has affected the dynamics of Politics. In this regard, we are going to study how power dynamics have changed since the emergence and the consequent pervasiveness of Cyberspace.  In order to do that we will explore how the fundamentals of Politics have been challenged by the cyberspace. In the beginning, we will examine how two terms are related to each other. For our ease, we are going to simplify the definition of Politics by encapsulating it in the phrase called “dynamics of human interaction”. This will set the stage for further analysis. The direction we are going to take is that how human interaction has been impacted by cyberspace. The main question being: how has the power balance changed with the pervasiveness of Cyberpsace. In that regard, we are going to explore related questions such as the future of politics in cyber space; economy in cyber space; etcetera.  A very interesting part of the course would be the incorporation the concept of power given by Michel Foucault. This will enable us to understand power in cyberspace from a critical lens.

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

After completing this course, the students should be able to;

a)      Understand / describe the changes in politics after cyberspace

b)      Learn the theoretical challenges posed by cyber space to the conventional concepts such as nation-state

c)      Speculate how politics will unfold with even greater pervasiveness of cyberspace.

 

How did/do I endeavor to achieve the course objectives?

In this course, we started off with the importance of the merger of two terms cyber and politics. Then we brought into the idea of individual autonomy. Related to that there was a discussion on how can a specific theoretical lens can help us do

 

Teaching Method:

The classes will be based on interactive lectures and discussions. Lectures will cover all important points of a topic in shape of a series of questions that will be discussed in detail. Questions, debate and discussion will be strongly encouraged in the class but before that one-sided knowledge-based lecture will be given by the teacher to avoid irrelevant discussion. The classroom will maintain a spirit of open ended conversation, respect for diversity of opinion and collaborative learning.

 

Evaluation:

Evaluation of participants’ learning will be based on the following tasks:

Collaboration Marks (10): Students should contribute to the topic by sharing their opinion. Mocking other students’ opinion will result in negative marks. Irrelevant points will also result in negative marks. The fundamental of collaboration is to maintain conducive environment in the class

Quizzes (10): There will be 2 scheduled quizzes

Presentation (group) (10): Topics will be assigned to the group of four or five. Each participant has to speak on the topic for at least two minutes. Presentation will be followed by Questions and Answers from the students and teacher.

Assignment (5) 2 tasks will be assigned either in the class or take home.

Midterm: 25

Final: 40

Total -     100

Selected Readings

Nazli C. (2012) Cyber Politics in International Relations. MIT Press

 

 

A Note on the Academic Honesty

 

It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. These policies prohibit all acts of cheating, lying, and deceit in their diverse forms. Students must especially be aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s ideas or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to talk to the resource person about it.

 

Weekly Schedule

Imp: Essential Reading for Week 1- 7: Globalization: A very short Introduction. Oxford

Week 1

Introduction to students & course

Cyber and Politics > the rational of the merger of two terms  

Week 2

History of Globalization

Individual Autonomy and Cyberspace

Week 3

Nation-state and Cyberspace

Week 4

Lateral Pressure Theory

Week 5

Kenneth Waltz and the fourth image

Week 6

 Kenneth Waltz and the fourth image

Week 7

Cyberspace and Theory matters in IR and Politics

 

Week 8

Midterm Examination

Week 9

 Case study of Australia and Facebook > analysis

Week 10 - 11

New Domains of International Relations

Week 12

New Domains of International Relations

Week 13

Cyber Content: Leveraging Knowledge and Networking

Week 14

Foucault’s concept of Power and Cyberspace

Week 15

Final Presentations

Week 16

Final Examination

 

GOVERNANCE AND DEMOCRACY IN PAKISTAN

 

 

Duration: The coursework will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Good governance emerged in the 1990s, after, as one of the most important and enduring new areas of policy and practice in development studies. Since then, a critical policy issue has been how to reform and rebuild states in the developing world, focusing on two key areas: the creation of more effective and legitimate legal, administrative, financial and policymaking institutions; and the promotion of social justice and empowerment for poor people by harnessing an active civil society. This course provides students with a theoretically informed understanding of debates on governance and democracy.

 

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a sound theoretical and practical understand of the  concept under study based on the research-based publications at the forefront of academic discipline of Political Science and Public Policy.
  • Recognize and apply relevant theoretical approaches to the study of Pakistan’s socio-political environment, by critically evaluating the key debates about good governance and democracy in Pakistan.
  • Discuss and review the role played by democratic/non-democratic institutions in the developing countries like Pakistan
  • Synthesize information (which may be conflicting in Pakistani context), evaluate academic arguments and construct persuasive analysis of contemporary debates on the role of international community in this regard.
  • Identify practical deterrents in the way of good governance in Pakistan.

 

 

 

TEACHING METHODS

           

Course will be taught by using Inquiry based learning techniques. Students will be asked to read the reading material given in advance and take an active part in discussions during the class. The evaluation will be based on a research based assignment of 2000 words followed by a class presentation, 4 quizzes, Midterm and Final Term examination. Students are required to send their assignment two weeks before the final term exams. Late submission will be marked negatively and 10% marks will be deducted. The purpose of these quizzes is to keep students engaged in learning from the very beginning and to ensure two way traffic of knowledge. On university’s prescribed dates Mid Term and Final Term Examinations will be held.

 

COURSE DURATION

           

It will run for one semester covering 15 weeks of teaching. Every week, there will be one class of three hours.

                       

Evaluation:

 

 

 

Written Assignments (2500 words)                           20 Marks

4 Group Presentations                                               10 Marks

4 (Quizzes)                                                                   10 Marks

Mid Term Exam                                                          30 Marks

Final Exam                                                                   30 Marks

 

Total                                                                            100Marks

 

 

 

COURSE POLICIES

A Note on Academic Honesty: It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. Since this class includes research component, students must also be fully aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s idea or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question or confusion about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to talk to me.

Make-up Exams and Late Assignments: There will be no make-up exams, unless there is a valid (documented) reason for not taking the scheduled exams, or prior arrangements have been made with the instructor.

 

Class Rules & Regulation: If any student misses classes more than prescribed numbers of classes by the University, he or she may not be able to appear in the Final Examination or short attendance will be treated according to the Policy of University.

 

Essential Reading:

 

 

 

COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIDNMENTS

(Note: This course schedule is subject to revisions under some unavoidable circumstances)

 

 

Week One: Introduction to the course:

 

  • What is Governance?
  • Dimensions and Elements of the Good Governance
  • Good Governance and Sustainable Development

 

 

 

 

Week 2:  Theory and Practice of Governance and Democracy in Pakistan

 

 

  • The Nature of Democracy and Governance in Pakistan : The Dynamics of Power
  • Styles of Governance: Ayub to Nawaz Sharif

 

  • Tahir Kamran  (2008)  Democracy and Governance in Pakistan, (Lahore: South Asian Partnership)
  • Rizvi, Hasan Askari (1997) The Military and Politics In Pakistan 1947-97. (Lahore:Sang-e-Meel)

 

 

Week 3: Theory and Practice of Governance and Democracy in Pakistan(Continued).

 

  • Styles of Governance: Ayub to Nawaz Sharif

 

  • Governance the External Factor

 

 

  • Tahir Kamran  (2008)  Democracy and Governance in Pakistan, (Lahore: South Asian Partnership)
  • Rizvi, Hasan Askari (1997) The Military and Politics In Pakistan 1947-97. (Lahore:Sang-e-Meel)

 

 

 

Week 4:  Decentralization and Devolution

 

 

 

Week 5: Bureaucracy: Role of Bureaucracy in implementing Good Governance

 

 

 

Week 6: Accountability and Transparency/ Judiciary: Challenges and the Way Forward

 

  • Amanullah Shah, Shadiullah and Mobina Mehsud, Analysis of Judicial Independence and Judicial Accountability in Pakistan
  • http://www.supremecourt.gov.pk/web/user_files/file/thejudicialsystemofpakistan.pdf

 

Week 7: Governance, Democracy and Media: Role of Media in Promoting Good Governance

 

 

 

 

Week 8: MIDTERM

 

 

Week 9: Good Governance and Corruption free Public Service

 

 

 

Week 10: Electoral Politics of Pakistan

 

 

 

Week 11: Women’s Political Participation for Effective Democratic Governance

 

  • Shabana Shamaas Gul KhattakAkhtar Hussain- Women Representation in Pakistani Legislatures -A Study of 2002, 2008 and 2013 General Elections
  • Rubina Saigol- Feminism and the Women’s Movement in Pakistan Actors, Debates and Strategies  - http://library.fes.de/pdf-files/bueros/pakistan/12453.pdf

 

 

Week 12: RELIGIOUS MINORITIES IN PAKISTAN

 

 

 

 

 

Week 13: Class Presentations

 

Week 14: Class Presentations

 

Week 15: Revision and Exam Discussion

 

 

Comparative Political Systems (Developed)

Course Description

The course is designed to give an understanding to the students about the functioning of the political systems and their structure. In this course efforts are made to cover the various aspects of Political Systems of France, United States of America and United Kingdom. The purpose of this course is to generate awareness among the students about the actual functioning of these political systems. This study will enable them to compare any other political system and find out the reasons of its malfunctioning and solution of various problems faced in it.

Course Objectives

  1. To gain a general overview of the competing ideas of constitutions of developed nations.
  2. To assess the various aspects of political systems of France, USA and UK.
  3. To encourage students to think independently and critically. Through the question-and-answer process, students will develop their critical thinking skills by evaluating rationally the strengths and weaknesses of various competing political systems.
  4. To appreciate better the enduring historical significance of constitutions of these countries.
  5. To develop reading comprehension skills through a close textual analysis.
  6. To enable students to compare different political systems working in the developed world.

 

Teaching Method

 

The course will be based on interactive discussions and student centered learning activities through an emphasis on both active and cooperative learning. Periodical assessment and evaluation through quizzes, mid-term and final examinations will be part of the course.

 

Quizzes: Total six quizzes would be held in which three would be taken before midterm and three after midterm examinations. No makeup of quizzes will be held. Cumulative percentage of all quizzes will be 15% of the final grade.

Research Assignments: Students are required to write “two” research assignments. Topic of the assignments should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, assignment should include atleast five articles from academic journals. This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in their assignments. These assignments will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on these assignments at their earliest, and consult me along the way to make sure that they are on the right track.

Presentation: Students are required to present their research assignments during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 2.5% of the final grade.

Exams: there will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the classroom. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the classroom by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth of 25% and final exam will be worth of 40% of the total allocated marks.

Attendance & Class Participation: students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed; class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meeting and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited to reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the class activities. Overall, combined grade for attendance and participation is 2.5% of the student’s final grade.

Course Duration

 

The course work will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

Evaluation/ Grading

 

Final                                                                40%

Mid-term                                                         25%

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Assignments                                    15%

Attendance & Class Participation                     5%

 

Course Policies

 

Failing to attend more than 6 sessions will result in automatic short attendance in the course. Punctuality and academic honesty are of the utmost importance as well. It is important that you get to class sharply on time, and stay for the entire class session.

 

Course Schedule

 

Week1-

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. Nature and Scope of Comparative Politics

 

Week2-

  1. Political System of UK: An Introduction, p. 35-38
  2. Historical Development of the State, p. 39-42

 

Week3-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 43-46
  2. Political Institution/Quiz 1, p. 47-50

 

Week4-

  1. Branches of the Government, p. 51-57
  2. Electoral System, p. 57-61

 

Week5-

  1. The Party System, p. 62-68
  2. Elections/Quiz 2, p. 69-70

 

Week6-

  1. Political System of USA: An Introduction
  2. Major Features, p. 93-96

 

Week7-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 97-106
  2. Quiz 3

 

Week8- Mid-Term

 

Week9-

  1. Political Regime, p. 106-108
  2. Branches of Government, p. 109-114
  3. Submission First Research Assignment

 

Week10-

  1. 1.      Electoral System, p. 115-118
  2. Local Government/ Quiz 4, p. 119

 

Week11-

  1. Party System, Elections, p. 120-125
  2. Political System of France: An Introduction

 

 

Week12-

  1. Major Features, p. 149-154
  2. Quiz 5

 

Week13-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 155-162
  2. Political Institutions, p. 163

 

Week14-

  1. Branches of the Government, p. 164-172
  2. Electoral System/Quiz 6, p. 173-175

 

Week15-

  1. Party Systems, p. 175-182
  2. Labour Unions and Private Enterprise, p. 183-185
  3. Submission second research assignment

 

Recommended Book

 

O’Neil, H. P., Fields, K. & Share, D (2015) Cases in Comparative Politics, New York: Norton & Company

Kesselman, M., Krieger, J. & Joseph, A. W. (2009) Introduction to Comparative Politics, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Kesselman, M., Krieger, J. & Joseph, A. W. (2010) Introduction to Comparative Politics: Political Challenges and Changing Agendas, Boston: Wadsworth Cengage Learning

 

ADVANCED POLITICAL THEORY

INTRODUCTION

This is a survey course that covers major schools, traditions, theories and approaches of Political Science. This theoretical knowledge is essential to fully understand and appreciate modern day political concepts. In other words, this is a core Political Science course that is designed to provide solid theoretical foundations to those who want to pursue their careers in Political Science and related areas. This course is divided into two parts. Part one deals with major schools and traditions of Political Science. Part two deals with key concepts that are prevalent in the field of Political Science. Theories and concepts covered in the course deal with both classical works as well as most recent theoretical advancements. By attending this course students will develop critical thinking and analytical skills that will help them to be knowledgeable observers of the societies they live in. this course also aims at enhancing students’ research as well as oral and written communication skills.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After attending this course students will:

  1. Learn about major schools, traditions and theories of Political Science.
  2. Study key political concepts in the light of major theories.
  3. Be familiar with the latest theoretical and conceptual developments in Political Science.
  4. Learn to write and present research reports in political theory.
  5. Be able to learn to critically review major theoretical works.
  6. Learn to get engaged in scholarly communication and discussion.

BOOKS REQUIRED

Mohanty, Biswaranjan (2010) Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers and Distributors Inc.

Marsh, David and Gerry Stoker, eds. (2010) Theory and Methods in Political Science, 3rd ed., New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Sarantakos, Sotiris (2005) Social Research, 3rd ed., NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

BOOKS RECOMMENDED

Almond, G. A. and S. Verba (1963) A Discipline Divided: Schools and Sects in Political Science, Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Bandyopadhyaya, J. (1973) Mao Tse-tung and Gandhi, Delhi: Allied Publishers.

Boggs, Carl (1986) Social Movements and Political Power: Emerging Forms of Radicalism in the West, Philadelpia, PA: Temple University Press.

Duncan, Graeme (1973) Marx and Mill: Two views of Social Conflicts and Social Harmony, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Dunn, John (1988) Modern Revolutions: An Introduction to the Analysis of a Political Phenomenon, 2nd ed., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Farrelly, C. (2004) An Introduction to Contemporary Political Theory, London: Sage.

Friedrich, Carl J. (2006) Man and His Government: An Empirical Theory of Politics, New Delhi: Oxford.

Held, David (1989) Political Theory and the Modern State: Essays on State, Power and Democracy, Stanford, CS: Stanford University Press.

Hojer, M. and C. Ase (1999) the Paradoxes of Politics: An introduction to Feminist Political Theory, Lund: Academia Adacta.

Huntington, Samuel P. (1968) Political Order in Changing Societies, New Heaven: Yale University Press.

Kuper, Jessica, ed. (1987) Political Science and Political Theory, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Losco, Joseph: and Leonard Williams, eds. (1992) Political Theory: Classical Writings, Contemporary Views, New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Peters, B. G. (2005) Institutional Theory in Political Science: The New Institutionalism, 2nd ed. London: Continuum.

Sandel, M (1984) Liberalism and its Critics, Oxford: Blackwell.

Schumpeter, Joseph (1942) Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy, London: George Allen & Unwin.

Smith, S., K. Booth; and M. Zalewski, eds. (1996) Positivism and Beyond, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Thucydides (1951) The Peloponnesian War, NY: Modern Library.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING

Quizzes: Students are required to give at least six quizzes during the class timings. No re-take or make-up of quiz will be held. Cumulative percentage of all quizzes would be 15 % of the total marks.

Research Paper: Students are required to write a 15-20 page research paper consisting of 5500 to 6000 words. For others, Topic of the paper should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, paper should include at least fifteen articles from academic journals (or two books and ten academic articles). This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in their papers. This paper will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on the paper at their earliest, and consult me along the way to make sure that they are on the right track.

Presentation (Research Paper): Students are required to present their research papers during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 5% of the final grade.

Exams: There will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the classroom. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the classroom by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth 25% and final exam will be worth 35% of the final grade.

Attendance & Class Participation: students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meeting and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited o reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the class activities. Overall, combined grade for attendance and participation is 5% of the student’s final grade.

GRADES SUMMARY:

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Paper                                               15%

Presentation & Viva (Research Paper)             5%

Midterm Exam                                                25%

Final Exam                                                      35%

Attendance & Class Participation                     5%

Total                                                                100%

 

COURSE POLICIES

A Note on Academic Honesty: It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. These policies prohibit acts of cheating, lying and deceit in their diverse forms. Since this class includes research component, students must also be fully aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s idea or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question or confusion about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to talk to me.

Make-up Exams and Late Assignments: There will be no make-up exams, unless there is a valid (documented) reason for not taking the scheduled exams, or prior arrangements have been made with the instructor. As of late assignments, ten percent of the grade will be deducted for each day an assignment is late. Students will also lose percentage of assignment grades if incomplete assignments are turned in.

COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIDNMENTS

(Note: This course schedule is subject to revisions under some unavoidable circumstances)

Week 1: Introduction

Part I: Major Schools, Traditions and Approaches of Political Science

Week 2: An overview of Political Science and Its Main Traditions

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Nature and Scope of Political Science” Ch.1 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp.1-41

Week 3*: Key Schools and Approaches of Political Theory, Quiz 1

[Assignment Due: Research Paper Topic (Grade: 1%)]

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Introduction to Political Theory” and “Politics” Chs. 2 and 3 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp 42-93

Week 4*: The Traditional Approach to Political Science, Quiz 2

Required Readings:

Mohanty, “State”, Chs. 4 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 94-137

Recommended Reading:

Hall, P.A, and R. Taylor (1996) “Political Science and the Three New Institutionalisms,” Political Studies, 44(4): 936-957.

Week 5*: Liberalism, Quiz 3

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Liberalism,” Chs. 9 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 246-264.

Recommended Reading:

Gutmann, A. (1985) “Communitarian Critics of Liberalism,” Philosophy and Public Affairs, 14(3): 308-322.

Week 6: Democracy and Theories of Democracy

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Democracy and Scope of Human Rights” Chs. 22 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 625-665

Week 7*: Midterm Exams

Week 8: Marxism

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Marxism” Chs. 10 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 265-329

Week 9: Socialism

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Socialism” Chs. 11 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 330-372

Week 10*: Latest Theoretical Development I: Rational Choice, Constructivism and Interpretative Theory, Quiz 4

Required Reading:

Marsh & Stoker, “Rational Choice” and “Constructivism and Interpretative Theory,” Chs. 2 and 4 in Theory and Methods in Political Science, pp.42-59; and 80-98

[Assignment Due: Research Paper (Grade: 14%)]

Week 11*: Latest Theoretical Developments II: Politics of Feminism, Quiz 5

Required Reading:

Kulkarni (ed.), “Justice, Citizenship and the Politics of Feminism”, Chs. 4 in Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Political Theory, pp. 70-86

Part II: Basic Political Concepts

Week 12*: Nationalism, Quiz 6

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Nation and Nationalism” Chs. 8 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 223- 245.

Week 13: Political Authority

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Power, Legitimacy and Authority” Chs. 5 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 138-179

Recommended Reading:

Claessen, Henry (1988) “ Changing Legitimacy,” Ronald Cohen, and Toland, eds., state formation and Political Legitimacy, New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, pp. 23-44.

Dickinson, John (1929) “Social Order and Political Authority, “American Political Science Revies, 23(2):pp. 293-328.

Horowitz. Dan (1982) “Dual Authority Polities, “Comparative Politics, 14(3):pp. 329-349.

Week 13: Democracy and Political Rights

Required Readings:

Mohanty, “Democracy and Scope of Human Rights” Ch. 22 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 666-703.

Recommended Readings:

Mohanty,” Rights,” Ch.15 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 433-462.

Week 14: Political Ideals

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Liberty,” “Equality” and “Justice”, Chs. 16, 17 and18 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 463-516

Week 15: Presentations (Research Paper)

Week 16*: Final Term Exam

*Weeks when assignments will be due or exam will be conducted.

 

 

Foreign Policy Analysis IR 640

Introduction

This subject guide provides an introduction to the field of foreign policy analysis. Foreign policy is, to use Christopher Hill’s definition, ‘purposive action with the view towards promoting the interests of a single political community or state’. The study of foreign policy is referred to as foreign policy analysis, and its focus is the intentions and actions of (primarily) states aimed at the external world and the response of other actors (again, primarily states) to these actions. This course is not designed to give you detailed exposure to the changing foreign policies of any particular country, though of course you will have many opportunities to learn about the foreign policies of major, middle and small powers through the reading material. It is aimed at giving you the tools to analyse, interpret and, ultimately, understand the dynamics of foreign policy generally so that you might apply these to your study of the role of states in international affairs.

Goals and Learning Outcomes

The aims of this course are to:

  • introduce you to the central concepts in foreign policy analysis
  • develop your comparative skills of analysis of differing foreign policies in practice
  • promote critical engagement with the foreign policy analysis literature and enable you to display this engagement by developing an ability to present, substantiate and defend complex arguments.

By the end of this course, and having completed the Essential readings and activities, you should be able to:

  • identify and assess the processes involved in foreign policy decision making
  • discuss the contexts, pressures and constraints with which foreign policy makers have to deal
  • conduct comparative analysis of foreign policy without losing sense of historical context.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING

Quizzes: Six quizzes will be held during the semester. Three quizzes will be taken before the midterm and three after the midterm. Quizzes will count for 15% of the total marks. 

Research Paper/Case Study: Students are required to write a 15-20 page research paper with word ranges from 5000 to 6000. Topic of the paper should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, paper should include at least fifteen articles from academic journals (two books and ten academic articles). This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in-depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in the class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in the paper. This paper will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on the paper at their earliest, and consult teacher of the course along the way to make sure that they are on the right track.

Presentation (Research Paper/Case Study): Students are required to present their research papers/case study during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 5% of the final grade.

Exams: There will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the class room. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the class room by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth 25% and final exam will be worth 35 % of the final grade.

Attendance & Class Participation: Students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed. Class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meetings and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited, reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the in-class activities.

Grade Evaluation Criteria

Following is the criteria for the distribution of marks to evaluate final grade in a semester.

Marks Evaluation                 Marks in percentage                                    

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Paper                                               15%

Presentation (Research Paper)                         5%

Midterm Exam                                                25%

Final Term                                                      35%

Attendance and Class Participation                  5% ______________________________________________

Total                                                                100%

 

COURSE POLICIES

A Note on Academic Honesty: It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. These policies prohibit acts of cheating, lying and deceit in their diverse forms. Since this class includes research component, students must also be fully aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s ideas or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question or confusion about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to discuss with the teacher.

Make-up Exams and Late Assignments: There will be no make-up exams, unless there is a valid (documented) reason for not taking the scheduled exams, or prior arrangements have been made with the instructor. As of late assignments, ten per cent of the grade will be deducted for each day an assignment is late. Students will also lose percentage of assignment grades if incomplete assignments are turned in.

COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS

(Note: This course schedule is subject to revisions under some unavoidable circumstances)

  1. 1.      Introduction to the Course
  2. 2.      Introduction: Foreign Policy Analysis

Required Reading:

Valerie Hudson, “Introduction: The History and Evolution of Foreign Policy Analysis”, in Foreign Policy: Theories, Actors, Cases, pp. 13-34

  1. 3.      Decision Making in Foreign Policy

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Types of Decisions and Levels of Analysis in Foreign Policy Decision making”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 15-37

  1. 4.      Levels of Analysis, Quiz 1

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Types of Decisions and Levels of Analysis in Foreign Policy Decision making”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 15-37

  1. 5.      Biases in Decision Making, Quiz 2

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Biases in Decision Making”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 38-54

  1. 6.      Models, Quiz 3

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “The Rational Actor Model”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 57-67

  1. 7.      Models

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “The Rational Actor Model”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 57-67

  1. Midterm Exams
  2. 9.      Organizational Process and Bureaucratic Politics

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Alternatives to the Rational Actor Model”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 68-93

  1. 10.  Organizational Process and Bureaucratic Politics

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Alternatives to the Rational Actor Model”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 68-93

 

  1. 11.  Factors Affecting Decisions, Quiz 4

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Psychological Factors affecting foreign policy decisions”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 97-120

  1. 12.  Culture and National Identity, Quiz 5

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “International, Domestic and Cultural factors influencing foreign policy decision making”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 121-145

  1. 13.  Domestic Politics and Opposition, Quiz 6

Required Reading:

Christopher Hill and Elisabetta Brighi, “Implementation and Behaviour” in Foreign Policy: Theories, Actors, Cases, pp. 147-166

  1. 14.  Case Studies/Debates/Presentations
  2. 15.  Case Studies/Debates/Presentations
  3. 16.  Final Term Exams

 

BOOKS REQUIRED

Hudson, M. Valerie (2014) Foreign Policy Analysis: Classic and Contemporary Theory, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield

Kahneman, Daniel (2011) Thinking, Fast and Slow, New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Smith, S. Hadfield, A. & Dunne, T. (2016) Foreign Policy: Theories, Actors, Cases, New York: Oxford University Press

Alden, C. & Aran, A. (2017) Foreign Policy Analysis: New Approaches, New York: Routledge

Mintz, A. & DeRouen, K. (2010) Understanding Foreign Policy Decision Making, New York: Cambridge University Press

 

 

 Comparative Foreign Policies of Major Powers

Course Description

The course is designed to give an understanding to the students about the foreign policies of major powers of the world. In this course efforts are made to cover the various aspects of foreign policies of India, China and Russia. The purpose of this course is to generate awareness among the students about the actual functioning of these major powers in world affairs. This study will enable them to compare differences in the conduct of international relations of these powers.

Course Objectives

  1. To enhance the understanding of international context of foreign policy making by the major powers in the international context.
  2. To evaluate the domestic context in foreign policy making by three different states.
  3. To encourage students to think independently and critically. Through the question-and-answer process, students will develop their critical thinking skills by evaluating rationally the strengths and weaknesses of various competing political systems.
  4. It provides an introduction to the patterns and processes of foreign policy making and the analytical models of foreign policy decision-making.
  5. To develop reading comprehension skills through a close textual analysis.
  6. To explore the changes and continuity in the foreign policies of the major world powers, China, Russia and India.

 

Teaching Method

 

The course will be based on interactive discussions and student centered learning activities through an emphasis on both active and cooperative learning. Periodical assessment and evaluation through quizzes, mid-term and final examinations will be part of the course.

 

Quizzes: Total six quizzes would be held in which three would be taken before midterm and three after midterm examinations. No makeup of quizzes will be held. Cumulative percentage of all quizzes will be 15% of the final grade.

Research Assignments: Students are required to write “two” research assignments. Topic of the assignments should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, assignment should include atleast five articles from academic journals. This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in their assignments. These assignments will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on these assignments at their earliest, and consult me along the way to make sure that they are on the right track. One assignment

Presentation: Students are required to present their research assignments during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 2.5% of the final grade.

Exams: there will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the classroom. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the classroom by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth of 25% and final exam will be worth of 40% of the total allocated marks.

Attendance & Class Participation: students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed; class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meeting and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited to reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the class activities. Overall, combined grade for attendance and participation is 2.5% of the student’s final grade.

Course Duration

 

The course work will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

Evaluation/ Grading

 

Final                                                                40%

Mid-term                                                         25%

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Assignments                                    15%

Attendance/Presentations                                 5%

 

Course Policies

 

Failing to attend more than 6 sessions will result in automatic short attendance in the course. Punctuality and academic honesty are of the utmost importance as well. It is important that you get to class sharply on time, and stay for the entire class session. Student would be awarded “F” for short in attendance as per university policy.

 

Course Schedule

 

Week 1- Comparative Foreign Policy: An Introduction

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. Introduction to Foreign Policy

Week 2- Russian Foreign Policy

  1. The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 38-55
  • Olga Oliker, “Russian Foreign Policy in Historical  and Current Contexts: A Reassessment” RAND Report

Week 3-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. United States: Enemy or Strategic Partner
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The United States: The main enemy or strategic partner” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 111-186
  • Martin Russell (Oct 2018) “US-Russia Relations: reaching the point of no return?” European Parliamentary Research Service

Week 4-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. Russia with Europe
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “Europe: Russia’s “Traditional Orientation” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 345-421
  • Pavel Baev (2016) “Russia and Central and Eastern Europe: between Confrontation and collusion” IFRI Report, 97

Week 5-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. 1.      Relations with South Asian states
  2. 2.      Quiz 1
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 480-519

Week 6-Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. China under Xi Jinping
  2. Quiz 2
  • Huiyun Feng & Kai He (2017) “China under Xi Jinping: Operational code beliefs, foreign policy, the rise of China” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p. 19-35

Week 7-Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. US-China Relations
  2. Quiz 3
  • Huiyun Feng & Kai He (2017) “US-China security cooperation and competition: twenty-first century considerations” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.51-61
  • Peter Ferdinand “Sino-Russian Relations: An Analytical Overview” in Russia-China Relations by FIIA Report, 30

Week 8- Mid Term Exams

Week 9- Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. China and EU Relations
  2. China and Central Asia
  • Jing Men (2017) “EU-China Security Relations” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.62-73
  • Sarah Lain (2017) “China and Russia: Cooperation and competition in Central Asia” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.74-94

Week 10-

  1. China’s Role in Asia
  • Yitzhak Shichor (2017) “Maximizing output while minimizing input: change and continuity in China’s Middle East Policy” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.109-129
  • Ian Forsyth (2017) “Games with frontiers: China and the East and South China Sea’s disputes” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.144-058

Week 11-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 4
  2. An Introduction to Indian foreign policy
  • Kanti Bajpai (2015) “Five approaches to the study of Indian foreign policy” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 21-34

Week 12-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 5
  2. 2.      Nehruvian Foreign policy
  • Andrew B. Kennedy (2015) “Nehru’s Foreign Policy: Realism and Idealism Conjoined” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 92-103

Week 13-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Post-Nehru Foreign Policy
  • Surjit Mansingh (2015) “Indira Gandhi’s Foreign policy: Hard Realism” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 104-116
  • Srinath Raghavan (2015) “At the cusp of transformation: The Rajiv Gandhi Years, 1984-1989” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 117-130

Week 14-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 6
  2. Post-Cold War and Indian Foreign Policy
  • C. Raja Mohan (2015) “Foreign Policy after 1990: transformation through incremental adaptation” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 131-144

Week 15-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. 1.      Rani D. Mullen (2015) “India’s Soft Power” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 188-204
  2. 2.      David Scott (2015) “The Indian Ocean as India’s Ocean” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 466-480

 

 

Comparative Foreign Policies of Major Powers

Course Description

The course is designed to give an understanding to the students about the foreign policies of major powers of the world. In this course efforts are made to cover the various aspects of foreign policies of India, China and Russia. The purpose of this course is to generate awareness among the students about the actual functioning of these major powers in world affairs. This study will enable them to compare differences in the conduct of international relations of these powers.

Course Objectives

  1. To enhance the understanding of international context of foreign policy making by the major powers in the international context.
  2. To evaluate the domestic context in foreign policy making by three different states.
  3. To encourage students to think independently and critically. Through the question-and-answer process, students will develop their critical thinking skills by evaluating rationally the strengths and weaknesses of various competing political systems.
  4. It provides an introduction to the patterns and processes of foreign policy making and the analytical models of foreign policy decision-making.
  5. To develop reading comprehension skills through a close textual analysis.
  6. To explore the changes and continuity in the foreign policies of the major world powers, China, Russia and India.

 

Teaching Method

 

The course will be based on interactive discussions and student centered learning activities through an emphasis on both active and cooperative learning. Periodical assessment and evaluation through quizzes, mid-term and final examinations will be part of the course.

 

Quizzes: Total six quizzes would be held in which three would be taken before midterm and three after midterm examinations. No makeup of quizzes will be held. Cumulative percentage of all quizzes will be 15% of the final grade.

Research Assignments: Students are required to write “two” research assignments. Topic of the assignments should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, assignment should include atleast five articles from academic journals. This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in their assignments. These assignments will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on these assignments at their earliest, and consult me along the way to make sure that they are on the right track. One assignment

Presentation: Students are required to present their research assignments during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 2.5% of the final grade.

Exams: there will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the classroom. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the classroom by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth of 25% and final exam will be worth of 40% of the total allocated marks.

Attendance & Class Participation: students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed; class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meeting and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited to reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the class activities. Overall, combined grade for attendance and participation is 2.5% of the student’s final grade.

Course Duration

 

The course work will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

Evaluation/ Grading

 

Final                                                                40%

Mid-term                                                         25%

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Assignments                                    15%

Attendance/Presentations                                 5%

 

Course Policies

 

Failing to attend more than 6 sessions will result in automatic short attendance in the course. Punctuality and academic honesty are of the utmost importance as well. It is important that you get to class sharply on time, and stay for the entire class session. Student would be awarded “F” for short in attendance as per university policy.

 

Course Schedule

 

Week 1- Comparative Foreign Policy: An Introduction

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. Introduction to Foreign Policy

Week 2- Russian Foreign Policy

  1. The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 38-55
  • Olga Oliker, “Russian Foreign Policy in Historical  and Current Contexts: A Reassessment” RAND Report

Week 3-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. United States: Enemy or Strategic Partner
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The United States: The main enemy or strategic partner” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 111-186
  • Martin Russell (Oct 2018) “US-Russia Relations: reaching the point of no return?” European Parliamentary Research Service

Week 4-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. Russia with Europe
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “Europe: Russia’s “Traditional Orientation” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 345-421
  • Pavel Baev (2016) “Russia and Central and Eastern Europe: between Confrontation and collusion” IFRI Report, 97

Week 5-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. 1.      Relations with South Asian states
  2. 2.      Quiz 1
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 480-519

Week 6-Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. China under Xi Jinping
  2. Quiz 2
  • Huiyun Feng & Kai He (2017) “China under Xi Jinping: Operational code beliefs, foreign policy, the rise of China” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p. 19-35

Week 7-Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. US-China Relations
  2. Quiz 3
  • Huiyun Feng & Kai He (2017) “US-China security cooperation and competition: twenty-first century considerations” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.51-61
  • Peter Ferdinand “Sino-Russian Relations: An Analytical Overview” in Russia-China Relations by FIIA Report, 30

Week 8- Mid Term Exams

Week 9- Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. China and EU Relations
  2. China and Central Asia
  • Jing Men (2017) “EU-China Security Relations” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.62-73
  • Sarah Lain (2017) “China and Russia: Cooperation and competition in Central Asia” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.74-94

Week 10-

  1. China’s Role in Asia
  • Yitzhak Shichor (2017) “Maximizing output while minimizing input: change and continuity in China’s Middle East Policy” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.109-129
  • Ian Forsyth (2017) “Games with frontiers: China and the East and South China Sea’s disputes” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.144-058

Week 11-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 4
  2. An Introduction to Indian foreign policy
  • Kanti Bajpai (2015) “Five approaches to the study of Indian foreign policy” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 21-34

Week 12-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 5
  2. 2.      Nehruvian Foreign policy
  • Andrew B. Kennedy (2015) “Nehru’s Foreign Policy: Realism and Idealism Conjoined” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 92-103

Week 13-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Post-Nehru Foreign Policy
  • Surjit Mansingh (2015) “Indira Gandhi’s Foreign policy: Hard Realism” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 104-116
  • Srinath Raghavan (2015) “At the cusp of transformation: The Rajiv Gandhi Years, 1984-1989” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 117-130

Week 14-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 6
  2. Post-Cold War and Indian Foreign Policy
  • C. Raja Mohan (2015) “Foreign Policy after 1990: transformation through incremental adaptation” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 131-144

Week 15-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. 1.      Rani D. Mullen (2015) “India’s Soft Power” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 188-204
  2. 2.      David Scott (2015) “The Indian Ocean as India’s Ocean” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 466-480

 

 

International Relations Theory

 

 Required Text Books:         

 

  1. 1.      Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited.
  2. 2.      Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Course Description: 

Introduction

This MPhil level course is structured around three core engagements: IR as a branch of philosophical knowledge; IR as a social science; and IR as a dimension of ‘actual existing’ world politics. The course surveys both mainstream and critical approaches to the subject, examining how these theories conceptualize ‘the international’ as a field of study. The course explicitly relates IR to cognate disciplines, reflects critically on the conceptual frameworks and modes of analysis used by IR theories, and studies the co-constitutive relationship between the theory and practice of international relations.

.

Course Aims & Objectives:            

The course has four main aims:

 

  1. To enable students to assess the contributions and shortcomings of both mainstream and critical IR theories.
  2. To interrogate how ‘the international’ has been constructed as a field of study.
  3. To connect IR with debates, both methodological and theoretical, those have been germane to the formation of social science as a whole.
  4. To demonstrate how theory provides a road map by which to examine international events and processes.

Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will:

 

  1. Evaluate the advantages and difficulties of IR theories both in comparison to each other.
  2. Discuss critically about major IR theories, relating these both to contemporary events and historical processes.
  3. Possess the means to show how theory and practice intertwine in constituting mainstream and critical IR theories.
  4. Learn how to think and write critically about key debates in contemporary IR theory.

 

Teaching Method:    

Course will be conducted on Aristotelian Method i.e., the Lecture based discussion model along with homework assignments and evaluations through quizzes, Midterm and Final Term examinations. To ensure class participation of the attendees, students will be encouraged to raise more and more questions during and after the lecture.

 

Course Duration:      It will run for one semester covering 15 weeks of teaching. Every week, there would be two classes each of one hour & 20 minutes.

 

1.         The following assignments are to be completed for this course

 

Term Paper: Every student has to write one term paper which would be submitted just before one week of midterm exam. The length of term paper should be of 7 to 10 pages with 12 font size and doubled space. Students are supposed to send the soft copies of their papers on my Email and hard copies just one week before the Mid-Term Exams. There will be no further extension in the submission date. Late sending or submission will automatically be marked negatively with the ratio of -2 marks per day. Every Term paper would be checked word by word and those who adopted the habit of cut and paste or plagiarized the material will get zero. Appreciation would be for those who will write in their own words.

2.         Quizzes:

You must be ready for 8 Quizzes. The purpose of these quizzes is to involve students in class discussion and to get their full concentration to ensure two way traffic of knowledge. Class notes will be sufficient for the preparation of the Quizzes.    

 

Mid Term and Final Term Exams: On university’s prescribed dates you will have Mid Term and End/Final Term Examinations.

 

Evaluation:

Term Paper +Presentation                                          10 Marks

Quizzes                                                                       20 Marks

Mid Term Exam                                                          30 Marks

Final Exam                                                                  40 Marks

 

Total                                                                            100Marks

 

Class Rules & Regulation: If any student misses classes more than prescribed numbers of classes by the University, he or she may not be able to appear in the Final Examination or short attendance will be treated according to the Policy of University. If you require accommodation due to personal circumstances, please contact me. Using Cell Phone is strictly prohibited in the class but if you have any emergency Phone call you can get permission to attend the Phone call. Mutual discussion in the class is not allowed and violation of the above rules can lead towards punishment.

 

Week wise Course Schedule:  Positivism/Rationalism/Explanatory Theories

 

Week 1

  1. 1.                  What is Theory

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.1-14
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.1-6

 

  1. 2.                  Development of Theory in International Relations

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited.14-21
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.7-23

 

Week 2

  1. 1.                  Liberalism/Idealism 

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.23-31
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.55-70

 

  1. 2.                   Neo-Liberalism

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.31-50
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.70-81

           

Week 3

  1. 1.                  Realism

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp. 53-74
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.30-52

 

  1. 2.                  Structuralism

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.75-101
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.30-52

 

Week 4          

  1. 1.                  Marxism and Neo Marxism

Required Reading:

  1. 1.      Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations.New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.110-135
    1. 2.                  World System Theory

Required Reading:

  1. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. 110-135

 

Week 7

  1. 1.                  Dependency Theory

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.55-70

 

  1. 2.                  Overview Before mid Term Examination

 

Week 8           Mid Term Examination

 

Post Positivism/ Reflectivist/Constitutive/Interpretive Theories

 

Week 9          

  1. 1.                  Constructivism

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.183-193

 

  1. 2.                  Limitation, Criticism & Debate

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.193-202

 

Week 10

  1. Critical Theory

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.103-128
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.137-159

 

  1. Limitation, Criticism & Debate

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.103-128
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.137-159

 

Week 11

  1. 1.                  The English School

Required Reading:

  1. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.84-108

 

  1. 2.                  Limitation, Criticism & Debate

Required Reading:

  1. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.84-108

 

 

Week 12

  1. Feminist Perspectives

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.155-170
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.213-223

 

  1. Limitation, Criticism & Debate

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.170-182
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.223-232

 

Week 13

  1. 1.                  Post Modernism

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.129-135
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.162-172

 

  1. 2.                  Limitation, Criticism & Debate

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.135-142
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.172-182

Week 14

  1. 1.                  Green Politics

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.205-215
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.235-245

 

  1. 2.                  Theory , Practice and Application

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.215-230
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.245-255

 

Week 15        

  1. 1.                  Course Overview
  2. 2.                   Presentation

 

 Final Examination



 Intelligence and National Security

 

INTRODUCTION

 

This under graduate course is intended as an introduction to the study of intelligence and national security from an academic perspective. This course examines the many important roles that intelligence plays in the national security of any country. The course has three parts. Part I provides an overview of the conceptual foundations of intelligence studies, the traditional dimensions of intelligence activity and the debates about the role of secrecy and intelligence agencies. Part II explores the role of Intelligence Community in today's national security challenges, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and targeted assassinations, cyber-­- espionage, and cyber-­-warfare.

 

. TEXT BOOK REQUIRED:      

 

  1. 1.      Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press.
  2. 2.      Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing.

 

COURSE AIMS AND OBJECTIVES       

The course has four main aims:

 

  1. 1.      To develop an understanding of issues in intelligence & national security.
  2. To examine specific challenges to national security and their intelligence dimensions.
  3. To develop knowledge of the policy, legal, and ethical contexts of intelligence & national security.
  4. To apply learning through assignments that  develop written, oral, research, analytical, presentation  and other skills in individual and team environments.

 

 

TEACHING METHODS

Course will be conducted on Aristotelian Method i.e., the Lecture based discussion model along with homework assignments and evaluations through quizzes, Midterm and Final Term examinations. To ensure class participation of the attendees, students will be encouraged to raise more and more questions during and after the lecture.

 

COURSE DURATION       

It will run for one semester covering 15 weeks of teaching. Every week, there would be two classes each of one hour & 20 minutes

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING

 

1. Term Paper: Every student has to write one term paper which would be submitted just before one week of midterm exam. The length of term paper should be of 7 to 10 pages with 12 font size and doubled space. Students are supposed to send the soft copies of their papers on my Email and hard copies just one week before the Mid-Term Exams. There will be no further extension in the submission date. Late sending or submission will automatically be marked negatively with the ratio of -2 marks per day. Every Term paper would be checked word by word and those who adopted the habit of cut and paste or plagiarized the material will get zero. Appreciation would be for those who will write in their own words.

2. Quizzes:

You must be ready for 8 Quizzes. The purpose of these quizzes is to involve students in class discussion and to get their full concentration to ensure two way traffic of knowledge. Class notes will be sufficient for the preparation of the Quizzes.    

 

Mid Term and Final Term Exams: On university’s prescribed dates you will have Mid Term and End/Final Term Examinations.

 

Evaluation:

Term Paper +Presentation                                          10 Marks

Eight Quizzes                                                              20 Marks

Mid Term Exam                                                          30 Marks

Final Exam                                                                  40 Marks

 

Total                                                                            100Marks

 

COURSE POLICIES

 

A Note on Academic Honesty: It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. These policies prohibit acts of cheating, lying and deceit in their diverse forms. Since this class includes research component, students must also be fully aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s idea or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question or confusion about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to talk to me.

Make-up Exams and Late Assignments: There will be no make-up exams, unless there is a valid (documented) reason for not taking the scheduled exams, or prior arrangements have been made with the instructor. As of late assignments, ten percent of the grade will be deducted for each day an assignment is late. Students will also lose percentage of assignment grades if incomplete assignments are turned in.

Class Rules & Regulation: If any student misses classes more than prescribed numbers of classes by the University, he or she may not be able to appear in the Final Examination or short attendance will be treated according to the Policy of University. If you require accommodation due to personal circumstances, please contact me. Using Cell Phone is strictly prohibited in the class but if you have any emergency Phone call you can get permission to attend the Phone call. Mutual discussion in the class is not allowed and violation of the above rules can lead towards punishment.

 

COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIDNMENTS

(Note: This course schedule is subject to revisions under some unavoidable circumstances)

 

Part 1: Basic Concepts and Structure

 

Week 1

  1. 1.                  Introduction to Course

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p.1-4

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.1-8

 

  1. 2.                  Basic Concepts in Intelligence

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press.p. 5-10

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.9-17

 

Week 2

  1. 1.                  Intelligence and National Security

Required Reading:

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.17-29

 

  1. 2.                   Intelligence Process—Collection Disciplines

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press.p.10-15

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.30-42

 

Week 3

  1. 1.                  Intelligence Process—Analysis and Problems of Analysis

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 15-23

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.43-51

 

 

  1. 2.                  Intelligence Process—Producers, Consumers, and Politicization

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p.23-28

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.51-62

Week 4          

  1. 1.                  Intelligence Cooperation—Bilateral and Multilateral Cooperation

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press.p.28-35

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.62-69

 

  1. Intelligence Competition—Counterintelligence and the Aldrich Ames Case

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p.36-43

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.70-83

 

Week 7

  1. 1.                  Intelligence Competition—Denial, Deception, and Surprise

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 43-60

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.83-97

 

  1. Overview Before mid Term Examination

Week 8           Midterm Examination

 

Part 2

Week 9          

  1. 1.                  Oversight of the Intelligence Community and Accountability

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 61-73

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 98-102

 

  1. 2.                  Secrecy and Unauthorized Disclosures

Required Reading: Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p.74-85

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.103-111

Week 10

  1. 1.      Rendition, Torture, and Interrogation

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 85-95

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 112-119

 

  1. 2.      Cyber Espionage and Cyber Warfare

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. 96-110

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.220-231

Week 11

  1. 1.                  UAVs and Targeted Killings

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 115-220

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 232-241

 

  1. 2.                  UAVs and Targeted Killings

 

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p115- 125

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 243-251

 

Part 3: Contemporary Issues in Intelligence and Counter Intelligence

 

 

Week 12

  1. The 9/11 Attacks and Strategic Surprise

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 130-148

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 253-260

 

  1. Intelligence and the 2003 Iraq

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 150-163

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 261-273

Week 13

  1. 1.                  Intelligence and the Iranian Nuclear Program (2002-­-2015)

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 164-176

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 274-280

 

  1. 2.                  Intelligence and the Iranian Nuclear Program (2002-­-2015)

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 178-188

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.281-290

 

Week 14

  1. 1.                  Relationship between the Intelligence and Foreign Policy

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p.190-210

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 292-300

 

  1. 2.                  Impact of Foreign Policy and Intelligence Operations

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 211-225

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.301-315

 

Week 15        

  1. 1.                  Course Overview
  2. 2.                   Presentation

 

 Final Examination

 

 Comparative Political Systems (Developed)

Course Description

The course is designed to give an understanding to the students about the functioning of the political systems and their structure. In this course efforts are made to cover the various aspects of Political Systems of France, United States of America and United Kingdom. The purpose of this course is to generate awareness among the students about the actual functioning of these political systems. This study will enable them to compare any other political system and find out the reasons of its malfunctioning and solution of various problems faced in it.

Course Objectives

  1. To gain a general overview of the competing ideas of constitutions of developed nations.
  2. To assess the various aspects of political systems of France, USA and UK.
  3. To encourage students to think independently and critically. Through the question-and-answer process, students will develop their critical thinking skills by evaluating rationally the strengths and weaknesses of various competing political systems.
  4. To appreciate better the enduring historical significance of constitutions of these countries.
  5. To develop reading comprehension skills through a close textual analysis.
  6. To enable students to compare different political systems working in the developed world.

 

Teaching Method

 

The course will be based on interactive discussions and student centered learning activities through an emphasis on both active and cooperative learning. Periodical assessment and evaluation through quizzes, mid-term and final examinations will be part of the course.

 

Quizzes: Total six quizzes would be held in which three would be taken before midterm and three after midterm examinations. No makeup of quizzes will be held. Cumulative percentage of all quizzes will be 15% of the final grade.

Research Assignments: Students are required to write “two” research assignments. Topic of the assignments should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, assignment should include atleast five articles from academic journals. This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in their assignments. These assignments will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on these assignments at their earliest, and consult me along the way to make sure that they are on the right track.

Presentation: Students are required to present their research assignments during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 2.5% of the final grade.

Exams: there will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the classroom. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the classroom by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth of 25% and final exam will be worth of 40% of the total allocated marks.

Attendance & Class Participation: students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed; class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meeting and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited to reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the class activities. Overall, combined grade for attendance and participation is 2.5% of the student’s final grade.

Course Duration

 

The course work will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

Evaluation/ Grading

 

Final                                                                40%

Mid-term                                                         25%

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Assignments                                    15%

Attendance & Class Participation                     5%

 

Course Policies

 

Failing to attend more than 6 sessions will result in automatic short attendance in the course. Punctuality and academic honesty are of the utmost importance as well. It is important that you get to class sharply on time, and stay for the entire class session.

 

Course Schedule

 

Week1-

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. Nature and Scope of Comparative Politics

 

Week2-

  1. Political System of UK: An Introduction, p. 35-38
  2. Historical Development of the State, p. 39-42

 

Week3-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 43-46
  2. Political Institution/Quiz 1, p. 47-50

 

Week4-

  1. Branches of the Government, p. 51-57
  2. Electoral System, p. 57-61

 

Week5-

  1. The Party System, p. 62-68
  2. Elections/Quiz 2, p. 69-70

 

Week6-

  1. Political System of USA: An Introduction
  2. Major Features, p. 93-96

 

Week7-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 97-106
  2. Quiz 3

 

Week8- Mid-Term

 

Week9-

  1. Political Regime, p. 106-108
  2. Branches of Government, p. 109-114
  3. Submission First Research Assignment

 

Week10-

  1. 1.      Electoral System, p. 115-118
  2. Local Government/ Quiz 4, p. 119

 

Week11-

  1. Party System, Elections, p. 120-125
  2. Political System of France: An Introduction

 

 

Week12-

  1. Major Features, p. 149-154
  2. Quiz 5

 

Week13-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 155-162
  2. Political Institutions, p. 163

 

Week14-

  1. Branches of the Government, p. 164-172
  2. Electoral System/Quiz 6, p. 173-175

 

Week15-

  1. Party Systems, p. 175-182
  2. Labour Unions and Private Enterprise, p. 183-185
  3. Submission second research assignment

 

Recommended Book

 

O’Neil, H. P., Fields, K. & Share, D (2015) Cases in Comparative Politics, New York: Norton & Company

Kesselman, M., Krieger, J. & Joseph, A. W. (2009) Introduction to Comparative Politics, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Kesselman, M., Krieger, J. & Joseph, A. W. (2010) Introduction to Comparative Politics: Political Challenges and Changing Agendas, Boston: Wadsworth Cengage Learning 

 

 

 

Course Title: Introduction to Political Science

Essential Reading: Mazher ul Haq-‘Political Science: Theory and Practice’,  Bookland Private Limited, Urdu Bazhar, Lahore.

 

Course Description

This introductory course seeks to provide a comprehensive overview of key conceptual and thematic elements of political science. Students will gain knowledge of the scope of political science and understand how the discipline studies power relations in diverse social settings. The course takes a comparative approach while studying different functions and systems of government. Along with advanced western democratic systems, governmental frameworks in developing countries will also be explored.

 

Course Objectives

Students should be able to

  • Develop a comparative understanding of real-world politics
  • Appreciate the diversity in systems of government
  • Recognize the best-practices evolved over millennia

 

 

Class Attendance and Participation

Students must adhere to the university policy on class attendance; if a formal leave has not been obtained, exceeding the allowed number of absences will result in the termination of course registration. Moreover, if students fail to participate in any assigned class activity, and/or fail to maintain discipline during class, they will be penalized for the same in the assessment component for ‘class participation’.

 

Grade Summary

 

Presentation                            10

4 Quizzes before mid-term      4*2.5=10Marks

Mid-Term Exam                      30

4 Quizzes after Mid                 4*2.5=10Marks

End-Term Exam                      :40

________________________________

Total                                        : 100

 

Course Schedule

 

Week 01: The Nature and Scope of Political Science

 

  • An Introduction to Political Science.
  • Evolution of Political Science.
  • Scope of Political Science.

 

Week 02: The Nature, origin and Evolution of the State

 

  • Element of a State
  • Theories of the origin of the State

 

Week 03:Forms of Governments:

 

  • Parliamentary,
  • Presidential and

 

Week 04: Sovereignty

  • Attributes of Sovereignty
  • Kinds of Sovereignty

 

 

Week 05 Democracy:

  • Totalitarian Patterns
  • What is democracy?
  • How can we measure it?

 

Week 06: The Structure of Government

 

  • The Legislature
  • The Executive
  • The Judiciary
  • Separation of powers and check and balance in practice

 

Week 07: Levels of Government: Centralization/ Decentralization

 

  • Unitary and Federal System
  • Regionalism and Local Government

 

 

Week 08: Exam Discussion

 

 

            ***MID-TERM EXAM***

 

 

 

Week 9: International Relations: Study of Political Phenomena Between States

 

  • Approaches to International Relations

           

 

Week 10: Political Ideologies

 

  • Conservatism, Liberalism, Socialism and Fascism     

 

Week 11: International Organisation

 

  • International Organisation and World States

 

Week 12:  Political Participation

 

  • Election and Voting
  • Representation
  • Origin and development of Political parties/Types of parties

 

Week 13: Individual and the State

 

  • Relation between the Individual and the State
  • Law and Morality
  • Rights and Duties
  • Fundamental Rights in Islam
  • Rights of Minorities

 

Week 14: Political Dynamics

 

  • Public Opinion
  • Pressure Groups
  • Propaganda
  • Political Parties

 

Week 15: 

Exam Discussion

How to write?

 

***END-TERM EXAM***

 

Readings: Recommended Readings

 

 

 

  • Ethridge, M. E. and Handleman, H. (2004).Politics in a Changing World: A Comparative Introduction to Political Science.London: Thomason Wardsworth.

 

  • Grigsby, E. (2009). Analysing Politics: An Introduction To Political Science. London: Wadsworth.

 

  • Munroe, T. (2002). An Introduction to Politics: Lectures For First Year Student.Barbadoes:  Canoe Press.

 

  • Tansey, S. D.(2004). Politics: The Basics London: Routledge.

 

 Islam and the World Politics

Evaluation:

Two Presentations: 10 Marks

Research Paper (to be presented before the mid-term – 2500 - 3000 words): 20 Marks

Research Project (to be presented before the final-term   10 Marks

Midterm: 30 Marks

Final: 30 Marks

 

 

 

 

 

Course Summary

 

Islam in contemporary world represents a vast geographical domain. In physical terms, it includes over 1.7 billion Muslims spread all around the world and the Muslim majority states in the Middle East, North Africa, South, South East Asia and Central Asia. The multiple political issues within the Muslim world, the complex, deep rooted historical interaction between Islam and the West and recent alarms about militant Islamism remain key concerns of contemporary International Relations. This course aims to critically analyze the competing understandings and interpretations of Islam in world politics and the historical progression of events and ideas that shaped the modern Muslim world. The course will enable participants to critically examine multiple perspectives on contemporary Political Islam.

 

 

COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS

(Note: This course schedule is subject to revisions under some unavoidable circumstances)

 

Part 1 – Islam and World Politics

 

a)      Political Interpretation of Islam (Week 1,2,3,4,5)

 

Since, the ‘Political Interpretation of Islam’ is referred to the political philosophy of Maulana Abul A'la Maududi, first section of this course discusses his understanding and interpretation of Islamic Sharia on State, government and in detail. The section further discusses other theologians (Dr. Israr Ahmad) who believe in the political interpretation of Islam, however, differ with Maulana Maududi on the course that one should adopt for the achievement of the desired goal. The section further expands the discussion by discussing the views and works of Maulana Maududi and Javed Ahmad Ghamidi on the subject.

 

b)      Is Islam compatible with Democracy (6,7)

 

Week Eight- Mid Term Exam

 

Part II-

a)      Islam in World Politics - A Historical Overview from the Rise of Islam to present (Week 9,10,11)

 

This section takes a historical overview of Islam’s place in world politics and discusses the Rise of Islam on the world politics under the rightly guided Caliphs, The Umayyad, the Abbasid and Ottoman Caliphate’. The section further discusses the demarcation of the ‘Middle East’ after the collapse of Ottoman empire, birth of Israel, Religio - political activism in the Muslim World. decolonization, Arab Israel War, Iranian Revolution. War in Afghanistan / Iran Iraq war and its aftermath; Saudi Iran rivalry and its impact, rise in religious militancy, sectarianism, transnational militant networks. Rise of Islamic ‘Fundamentalism’, War in Syria and resulting immigrant crisis, the ISIS turmoil, the continuing Palestinian problem, instability in Afghanistan, Kashmir, Yemen and military operation against Islamist militancy in Pakistan.

 

b)      Contemporary Debates and Development- Politics and Paradigm (12,13,14)

 

A)     Shia vs. Sunni Political Islam and its impact on Middle Eastern Politics

a)      Sufi Political Thought in post 9/11 politics in Europe

b)      The Geo-politics of Wahabi / Salafi Movement

 

 

Presentations (Week 15)

 

 

Ahmed, I. (1987). The Concept of an Islamic State: An Analysis of the Ideological Controversy in Pakistan. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Bayat, A. (2007). Islam and Democracy: What is the Real Question? Leiden: Amsterdam University Press.

Esposito, J. L., Sonn, T., & Voll, J. O. (2015). Islam and Democracy after the Arab Spring. New York: Oxford University Press.

Ghamidi, J. A. (2015). Jihad and Punishment. In S. Saleem, Selected Essays of Javed Ahmad Ghamidi (pp. 237-302). Lahore: Al-Mawrid.

Ghamidi, J. A. (2015). State and Government. In S. Saleem, Selected Essays of Javed Ahmad Ghamidi (pp. 131-183). Lahore: Al-Mawrid .

Keddie, N. R. (1994). Sayyid Jamal al-Din 'al-Afghani'. In A. Rahnema, Pioneers of Islamic Revival (p. 11024). London: Zed books Ltd.

Nasr, S. V. (2001). Islamic Leviathan: Islam and the Making of State Power. New York: Oxford University Press.

Khatab, S., & Bouma, G. D. (2007). Democracy In Islam. Oxon: Routledge .

Ghamidi, J. A. (2015). Jihad and Punishment. In S. Saleem, Selected Essays of Javed Ahmad Ghamidi pp. 237-302. Lahore: Al-Mawrid.

Ghamidi, J. A. (2015). State and Government. In S. Saleem, Selected Essays of Javed Ahmad Ghamidi (pp. 131-183). Lahore: Al-Mawrid .

 Nasir, A. K. (2012). Jihad- Ek Mutaala. Lahore: Al-Mawrid.

Yahya, A. (2019). Islam and Khilafat. http://www.inzaar.pk/islaam-aur-khilafat-by-abu-yahya/

Yahya, A. (2019). Democracy, Dictatorship and Khilafat . http://www.inzaar.pk/jamhoriyat-amriyat-khilafat-by-abu-yahya/

Yahya, A. (2018). Mazhab aur Riyasat. http://www.inzaar.pk/mazhab-aur-riyasat-by-abu-yahya/

Ahmad, D. I. (2001). Islamic Renaissance - The Real task ahead. Lahore: Markazi Anjuman Khuddam-ul-Qur’an.

Ahmed, D. I. (2010). Jihad fi Sabilillah. Lahore: Tanzeem-e-Islami.

Commins, D. (1994). Hasan Al Banna (1906-1949). In A. Rahnema, Pioneers of Islamic Revival (pp. 125-149). London: Zed Books Ltd.

Husain, Z. (1986). Maulana Sayyid Abul A'La Maududi: An appraisal of his thought and political influence. South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies, 9(1), 61-81.

Jackson, R. (2011). Mawlana Mawdudi and Political Islam. Oxon: Routledge .

Keddie, N. R. (1994). Sayyid Jamal al Din 'al-Afghani. In A. Rahnema, Pioneers of Islamic Revival (pp. 11-24). London: Zed Books Ltd.

Khatab, S. (2006). The Political Thought of Sayyid Qutb: The theory of Jahiliyyah. Oxon: Rotledge.

Khatab, S., & Bouma, G. D. (2007). Democracy In Islam. Oxon: Routledge .

Maudoodi, S. A. (1960). First Principles of the Islamic State. Lahore: Islamic Publications Ltd.

Maududi, A. A. (1966). Khilafat o Malukiyat. Lahore: Idara Tarjuman ul Quran.

Maududi, A. A. (1979). Four Basic Qur’anic Terms . New Delhi: MMI publisher.

Maududi, S. A. (1927). Al Jihad Fil Islam. Delhi: Markazi Maktaba-yi Islami.

Qutb, S. (1964). Milestones. Lahore: Kazi Publications.

Rahnema, A. (1994). Pioneers of Islamic Revival. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Tripp, C. (1994). Sayyid Qutb: The political vision. In A. Rahnema, Pioneers of Islamic Revival pp. 154-180. London: Zed books Ltd.

Ahmed, I. (2016). Faraiz e deeni ka jamia tasawar.

Ahmed, I. (2019). Haqeeqat-e-Iman. Lahore: Maktba Khaddam Ul Quran.

Ahmed, I. (2019). Manhaj e Inqilab e Nabvi . Lahore: Maktba Khaddam Ul Quran.

 

Hitti, P. K. (2002). History of the Arabs: From the Earliest Times to the Present. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Khan, M. W. (2015). The Age of Peace. Noida: Goodword Books.

Khan, M. W. (2016). The Political Interpretation of Islam. New Delhi: Goodword Books.

Moin, B. (1994). Khomeini’s search for Perfection: Theory and Reality . In A. Rahnema, Pioneers of Islamic Revival (pp. 64-93). London: Zed books Ltd.

Nasir, A. K. (2012). Jihad- Ek Mutaala. Lahore: Al-Mawrid.

Rahnema, A. (1994). Pioneers of Islamic Revival. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

 Vaezi, A. (2004). Shia Political Thought. London: Islamic Centre of England.

Adiong, N. M., Mauriello, R., & Abdelkader, D. (2019). Islam in International Relations: Politics and Paradigms. New York: Routledge.

Adraoui, M.-A. (2016). Foreign Policies of Political Islam Movements: Of the Use and Reconstruction of an Ideological Reference . In D. Abdelkader, N. Adiong, & R. Mauriello, Islam and International Relations: Contributions to Theory and Practice. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Ahmed, A. (2013). The Thistle and the Drone: How America's War on Terror Became a Global War on Tribal Islam. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press.

Bayat, A. (2005). What is Post-Islamism? ISIM review 16, 5.

Bayat, A. (2007). Making Islam Democratic: Social Movements and the Post-Islamist Turn (1st ed.). California: Stanford University Press.

Bayat, A. (2013). Post-Islamism: The Many Faces of Political Islam. New York: OUP USA.

Bokhari, K., & Senzai, F. (2013). Political Islam in the Age of Democratization (1st ed.). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Casanova, J. (1994). Public Religions in the Modern World. London: University of Chicago Press.

Dakake, D. (2004). The Myth of a Militant Islam. In J. E. Lumbard, Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition: Essays by Western Muslim Scholars (pp. 3-38). Indiana: World Wisdom.

Esposito, J. L. (1983). Voices of Resurgent Islam. New York: Oxford University Press.

Esposito, J. L. (1998). Islam and Politics (4th ed.). New York: Syracuse University Press.

Esposito, J. L. (1999). Islam and the West: A Clash of Civilizations? In J. L. Esposito, The Islamic Threat : Myth or Reality? (3rd ed., pp. 212-240). New York: Oxford University Press.

Esposito, J. L. (1999). The Islamic Threat: Myth or Reality? (3rd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Esposito, J. L., & Kalin, I. (2011). Islamophobia: The Challenge of Pluralism in the 21st Century. New York: Oxford University Press.

Esposito, J. L., & Voll, J. O. (2001). Makers of Contemporary Islam (1st ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Flew, A., & Varghese, R. A. (2007). There Is a God: How the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind. New York: HarperOne.

Gerges, F. A. (1999). America and Political Islam: Clash of Cultures or Clash of Interests? Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Gerges, F. A. (2009). The rise of transnationalist Jihadis and the far enemy. In F. A. Gerges, The Far Enemy: Why Jihad Went Global (2nd ed.). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Hegghammer, T. (2009). Jihadi-Salafis Or Revolutionaries? In R. Meijer, Global Salafism: Islam's New Religious Movement (pp. 244-266). New York: Oxford University Press.

Kalin, I. (2004). Roots of Misconception: Euro-American perceptions of Islam before and after September 11. In J. Lumbard, Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition: Essays by Western Muslim Scholars (pp. 143-189). Indiana: World Wisdom.

Kazemi, R. S. (2004). Recollecting the spirit of Jihad. In J. E. Lumbard, Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition: Essays by Western Muslim Scholars (pp. 121-142). Indiana: World Wisdom.

Lewis, B. (1990). The Roots of Muslim Rage. The Atlantic, 266(3), 47-60.

Mamdani, M. (2011). Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: A Political Perspective on Culture and Terrorism. In F. Volpi, Political Islam: A Critical Reader (1st ed., pp. 109-125). London: Routledge.

Mandaville, P. (2007). Global Political Islam. London: Routledge.

Moyser, G. (2002). Politics and Religion in the Modern World. London: Routledge.

Ramdan, T. (2008, January 1). Religion and the Modern World: An Interview with Tariq Ramadan. St Antony's International Review, 3(2), 94-102.

Roy, O. (1994). The Failure of Political Islam. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Said, E. W. (2001, October 4). Clash of Ignorance. The Nation.

Shah, T. S., Stepan, A., & Toft , M. D. (2012). Rethinking Religion and World Affairs. New York: Oxford University Press.

Shah-Kazemi, R. (2015). From the Spirituality of Jihad to the Ideology of Jihadism.

Thomas, S. (2005). The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations: The Struggle for the Soul of the Twenty-First Century. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Tibi, B. (2007). Political Islam, World Politics and Europe: Democratic Peace and Euro-Islam versus Global Jihad. London: Routledge.

Tibi, B. (2012). Why Islamism is not Islam. In B. Tibi, Islamism and Islam (pp. 1-30). London: Yale University Press.

Zarabozo, J. A.-D. (2010). The Life, Teachings and Influence of Muhammad Ibn Abdul-Wahhaab. Riyadh: International Islamic Publishing House.

Schwarz, T. B., & Lynch, C. (2003). Religion in International Relations: The Return from Exile. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Khan, Z. A. (2008). Concept of Jihad in Islam (An Analytical Study in the Light of the Quran and the Sunnah of the Prophet). The Dialogue, 3(2), 168-190.

Iftikhar, A. (2004). Jihad and the Establishment ofIslamic Global Order: A Comparative Study of the Worldviews and Interpretative Approaches of Abü al-A'la Mawdüdi and Javed Ahmad Ghamidi. Ottawa: Heritage Branch. https://www.worldcat.org/title/jihad-and-the-establishment-of-islamic-global-order-a-comparative-study-of-the-worldviews-and-interpretative-approaches-of-abu-al-a-la-mawdudi-and-javed-ahmad-ghamidi/oclc/61742999

Nasr, S. V. (1996). Mawdudi and the making of Islamic revivalism. New York: Oxford University press.

 

 

 

Peace and Conflict Studies                   

 

 

Introduction:

 

Peace and Conflict Studies or Peace Studies is a vast trans-disciplinary domain. This course aims to explore selective aspects of Peace Studies that relate to International Relations theoretical and historical context. The course is divided into two parts. The first part discusses the idea of peace in International Relations through different stages of contemporary history. The second part explores deeper roots of the present structural, cultural and personal violence.

Learning Outcomes:

 

After completion of the course, the participants should be able to;

a)      Recognize multiple conceptions of peace and key peace terminology 

b)      Understand the historical evolution of Peace Studies and its connection with Security Studies

c)      Recap how foundational debates in International Relations discuss the problem of peace

d)      Recognize how Marxist and Critical Perspectives in International Relations view the problem of peace

e)      Appreciate Johan Galtung’s contribution to Peace Studies

f)       Recognize contemporary Decolonial and Post-colonial perspectives on structural, cultural  and historical violence embedded in modernity

g)      Critically analyze post 9/11 Terrorism and Counter terrorism discourse

 

Teaching Method:

The class will be divided into two sessions; interactive lecture and reading based tasks. Interactive lectures will usually begin with a starter activity that invites thinking. Lectures will cover important points of a topic in shape of a series of questions / discussion points. In the second session participants will be assigned reading based tasks, they will summarize and discuss main points of the topic. Questions, debate and discussions are strongly encouraged in the class. The classroom will maintain a spirit of open ended conversation, respect for diversity of opinion and collaborative learning.

The resource person shall take on the role of a facilitator in learning rather than that of a traditional instructor. Since you are aiming for a ‘doctorate of philosophy’ degree, you have to be trained to think and question deeper like a philosopher. Hence, the purpose of teaching in this course is not just to throw information at you but to train you to think and reflect critically.

Please note that ‘unlearning’ is an essential part of the learning process. You should be willing to embrace new ideas and consider fresh perspectives. Moreover, always be very honest with your academic pursuits and be willing to say ‘I don’t know’ whenever needed. I am in it with you. I expect a very open but responsible conversation in the class.

 

Evaluation:

Evaluation of participants’ learning will be based on the following tasks;

Weekly Reading Based Assignment: Critical Reflection / Individual Presentations –

20 (10+10)

Each student will maintain weekly record of notes/ critical reflections based on essential reads. Students will be present their work by rotation each week – 5 students in each class. 10 marks will be based on a) notes record b) presentations

[average marks will be added towards end of midterm (10) and final term (10)- absents will be marked 0/10 – only one exception is allowed in each half – lowest marks Or 1 absent will be deleted from the total]

Group Project (Group size 3-4):  5 marks – Peace Action- One change that I can makeField based project and report (one page report including contribution of individual members in writing ) and presentation

Midterm: 25

Final: 50

Total -     100

A Note on Flexibility

 

The weekly schedule outlined below will be followed most of the time, however some flexibility to this schedule and outline may be allowed as the course develops. Some relevant readings/ activities may be added to the outline if and when required.

 

A Note on the Academic Honesty

 

It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. These policies prohibit all acts of cheating, lying, and deceit in their diverse forms. Students must especially be aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s ideas or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to talk to the resource person about it.

 

Weekly Schedule

Note: Selected Readings are essential readings to be read , summarized and reflected upon each week.

Week 1 , 2 and 3

W1 ) Introduction

 

W2 )The Idea of Peace – students’ visions of peace collected

Course Outline Discussed

PPT – Negative and Positive Peace , Types of Peace Literature

Peace Terminology

Qs on PPT

             

 

Week 4 and 5

Peace Studies , Security Studies and Conflict Resolution; Convergences and Divergences  

 

 

Week 6

Peace in International Relations-

Johan Gatlung’s perspective on Peace

 

 

 

Week 7

 

Peace in International Relations

Liberal and Realist Perspectives on Peace

 

 

Week 8

 

Midterm Examination

 

Week 9

Peace in International Relations

Marxist and Critical Perspectives on Peace

 

Selected Readings

 

 

Week 10 and 11

 

Peace Education and Critical Pedagogy

Week 12

Peace in International Relations

 Clash of Civilizations

 

 

 

 

Week 13

Terrorism , Counter Terrorism and Critical Terrorism Studies  

 

 

 

Week 14

Colonialism , Coloniality and the Decolonial Option

Focus: Deeper , historical roots of contemporary structural, cultural, personal violence

 

 

 

Week 15

 

Students’ Project Presentations

 

 

Week 16

Final Examination

 

Selected Readings:

-         Peace and Security: Two Evolving Concepts and Their Changing Relationship

             Ole Wæver in Globalization and Environmental Challenges , p 99

-          Violence, Peace and Peace Research. Johan Galtung. 1969 . Journal of Peace Research

Jackson, Richard, Georg Sørensen, and Jørgen Møller. Introduction to international relations: theories and approaches. Oxford University Press, USA, 2019

-          Richmond, O.P. (2008). Peace in International Relations. Routledge , Chapter 3

-          Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order. Samuel P. Huntington.1993- selected chapters

-          Clash of Ignorance. Edward Said

-          ‘Shaping a vision: The nature of Peace Studies’, Conrad G. Brunk  In Peace and Conflict Studies: A Reader, Edited by Charles P. Webel and Jorgen Johansen.2012

( Available in hard form)

-          Peace Terms: Glossary of Terms for Conflict Management and Peacebuilding , USIP pdf.

 

Recommended Readings

-          Critical Theories, Radical Pedagogies, and Social Education: New Perspectives for Social Studies Education

-          Peace education theory: Ian M. Harris

-          Education for Critical Consciouness. Paulo Freire

-          Key Works in Critical Pedagogy. Joe L. Kincheloe

 

-          ‘Academics for Peace’ in Turkey: A Case of Criminalizing Dissent and Critical Thought via Counter-Terrorism Policy. Bahar Baser, Samim Akgonul & Ahmet Erdi Ozturk

-          UNESCO Policy guide: Preventing Violent Extremism through Education

-          Security and Emancipation. Ken Booth

-          The deradicalisation of education: terror, youth and the assault on learning

-          Mayssoun Sukarieh and Stuart Tannock

-          Coloniality: The Darker Side of Modernity, Walter Mignolo

-          Decolonizing Post-Colonial Studies and Paradigms of Political-Economy: Trans-modernity, Decolonial Thinking, and Global Coloniality

-          On Decoloniality, Walter Mignolo & Catherine Walsh. 2018

-           

-          Byrne, Sean; Clarke, Mary Anne; and Rahman, Aziz (2018) "Colonialism and Peace and Conflict Studies," Peace and Conflict Studies: Vol. 25: No. 1 , Article 1.

-          Coloniality : Key Dimensions and Critical Implications, Chapter 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

           

 

           

           

 

 

 

 

           

 

           

           

           

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNIVERSITY OF MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY

Department of Political Science & International Relations

Ancient Political Thought

Recommended Books

 

1. Earnest Barker, Greek Political Thought: Plato & Aristotle, London, 1964

2. G.H.Sabine, History of Political Thought, London, 1980

3. D.R. Bhandari, History of European Political Thought, New Delhi, 1962.

4. White, Stephen K. & Moon J. Donald, What is Political Theory? London: Sage Publications, 2004

5. Sinclair, Alistair J. What is Philosophy: An Introduction, Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press, 2008

6. Annas, Julia, Ancient Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction, London: OUP, 2000

7. Ebenstein, Williams. Great Political Thought: Plato to the Present, Illionis: Dryden Press, 1989

8. John Somerville and Ronald Santoni (eds.), Social and Political Philosophy: Readings from Plato to Gandhi, Anchor, 1963

9. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, Aristotle, Florence: Routledge, 1995

10. T. A. Sinclair, A History of Greek Political Thought, New York: Routledge, 2010

11. George T. Menake, Three Traditions of Greek Political Thought: Plato in Dialogue, Maryland:    United Press of America, 2004

 

 

Course Description

This course is designed to provide students grounding in evolution of Greek Political thought and institutions. The significance of this course is that Greek philosophy and institutions provided the basis for further development of the political studies.

Course Objectives

  1. To gain a general overview of the competing ideas on human nature, justice, rights, freedom, moral ontology, happiness that shaped the Western political tradition.
  2. To challenge students to demonstrate how every conception of government implies a view of human nature and destiny and that no adequate understanding of politics and its goals is possible without a systematic consideration of the essence of the human condition.
  3. To encourage students to think independently and critically. Through the question-and-answer process, students will develop their critical thinking skills by evaluating rationally the strengths and weaknesses of various competing moral systems and political options.
  4. To appreciate better the enduring significance of the ideas of the great political thinkers.
  5. To develop reading comprehension skills through a close textual analysis of selected works of the great political thinkers.

 

Teaching Method

 

The course will be based on interactive discussions and student centered learning activities through an emphasis on both active and cooperative learning. Periodical assessment and evaluation through quizzes, class tests, mid-term and final examinations will be part of the course.

 

Course Duration

 

The course work will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

 

Evaluation/ Grading

 

Final                                                                40%

Mid-term                                                         25%

Quiz                                                                10%

Presentation                                                    10%

Assignments                                                    10%

Collaboration Marks                                       05%

 

Course Policies

 

Failing to attend more than 6 sessions will result in automatic short attendance in the course. Punctuality and academic honesty are of the utmost importance as well. It is important that you get to class sharply on time, and stay for the entire class session.

 

 

Course Schedule

 

Week1- Introduction: What is Political Philosophy?

 

In this week, we will learn the significance of political philosophy. How political philosophies provide the discipline of political science with normative theories. We will connect this with the Philosophy in Greek society, particularly in the city state of Athens.

 

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. S. A. Palekar, “Analysis of Political Thought” in Western Political Thought (Jaipur: Global Media, 2008), 14-33

 

Week2- Political Institutions in Ancient Greek

 

We will discuss what type of political institutions existed in Athens and Greece in general. Why are they worth reading and what were the morals of that society at that time?

 

  1. B. E. Hammond, “Greek Political Institutions” in Political Institutions of the Ancient Greeks (The University of Michigan: C. G. Clay and Sons, 1895), 23-36
  2. Sarah B. Pomeroy and Stanley M. Burstein, “Early Greece and the Bronze Age” in Ancient Greece: A Political, Social and Cultural History (New York: OUP, 1999), 1-39

 

Week3- The Philosophy of Stoics and Epicureans

 

We will discover the basic premises of the philosophy of Stoics and Epicureans. In this week, we will understand their view on rationality.

 

  1. N. Jayapalan, “The Epicurean Philosophy and the Stoic Philosophy” in Comprehensive History of Political Thought (New Delhi: The Publishers, 2001), 41-50
  2. A. A. Long, “Epicurus and Epicureanism” in Hellenistic Philosophy: Stoics, Epicureans, Sceptics (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986), 14-74
  3. A. A. Long, “Stoicism” in Hellenistic Philosophy: Stoics, Epicureans, Sceptics (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986), 14-74

 

Week4- The Philosophy of Socrates (Examined Life, Method, Citizenship)

 

We will step into the world of famous philosopher called Socrates. In this regard, his method famously known as “Socratic Method” will be discussed.

 

  1. Thomas C. Brickhouse and Nicholas S. Smith, “Socratic Method” in Plato’s Socrates (New York: OUP, 1994) 1-29

 

 

Week5- Plato: Life from Politics to Philosophy

 

In this week, we shall explore the philosophy of Plato, who was a student of Socrates. He is believed to have brought the ideas of his teacher, Socrates, into writing.

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “ Plato” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 54-100
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Xenophon. Plato’s Politicus or Statesman” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 169-185
  3. George T. Menake, “Development of Plato’s Thought and His Early Dialogues as Prologue to the Republic” in Three Traditions of Greek Political Thought: Plato in Dialogue (Maryland: United Press of America, 2004) 243-284

 

 

 

Week6- Plato: The Best Political Order, the Quest for Justice

 

We will continue our debate on Plato’s theory. In this week, we shall step into the realm of political philosophy and how he advanced the idea of Socrates and formed a political lens. In this week, we shall also discuss Plato’s view on justice. In the end, we will critique his view.

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “ Plato” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 54-100
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Plato’s Laws” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 186-208
  3. George T. Menake, “Plato as Reformer: The Laws” in Three Traditions of Greek Political Thought: Plato in Dialogue (Maryland: United Press of America, 2004) 361-396

 

Week7- Plato: Politics and the Soul, the Government of Philosopher Rules

 

Plato’s view on the type of government will be discussed. This week would involve discussing in detail his idea of Philosopher’s King.

 

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “ Plato” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 54-100
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Plato’s Republic” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 143-168
  3. George T. Menake, “Plato as Prophet-Philosopher” in Three Traditions of Greek Political Thought: Plato in Dialogue (Maryland: United Press of America, 2004) 313-360

 

Week8- Mid-Term

 

Week9- Aristotle’s Science of Regime Politics

 

We shall discover how Aristotle brought rigor into the study of politics by making it less abstract and idealistic.

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “Aristotle” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 101-147
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Aristotle” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 209-238
  3. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, “Philosophy of Nature” in Aristotle (Florence: Routledge, 1995) 65-116

 

Week10- Aristotle’s View of Politics

 

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “Aristotle” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 101-147
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Aristotle” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 209-238
  3. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, “Politics” in Aristotle (Florence: Routledge, 1995) 195-243

Week11- Aristotle: Ethics and Politics

 

  1. Subrata Mukherjee and Sushila Ramaswamy, “Aristotle” in A History of Political thought: Plato to Marx (New Delhi: PHI, 2011) 101-147
  2. T. A. Sinclair, “Aristotle” in A History of Greek Political Thought (New York: Routledge, 2010) 209-238
  3. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, “Ethics” in Aristotle (Florence: Routledge, 1995) 244-279

 

 

Week12- Aristotle: Logic and Philosophy of Science, Metaphysics and Biology

 

  1. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, “Logic” in Aristotle (Florence: Routledge, 1995) 21-64
  2. David Ross and J. L. Ackrill, “Metaphysics” in Aristotle (Florence: Routledge, 1995) 161-194

 

Week13- Roman Political Thought

 

  1. Judd Harmon, Political Thought (New York:1964),75-90

 

Week14- Presentations

 

 

 

Week15- Course Review

 

Week 16- Final Examination

 

 

  POL-498 Cyber Politics

 

Introduction:

This course is an analysis of how Information Technology in general and Cyberspace in particular has affected the dynamics of Politics. In this regard, we are going to study how power dynamics have changed since the emergence and the consequent pervasiveness of Cyberspace.  In order to do that we will explore how the fundamentals of Politics have been challenged by the cyberspace. In the beginning, we will examine how two terms are related to each other. For our ease, we are going to simplify the definition of Politics by encapsulating it in the phrase called “dynamics of human interaction”. This will set the stage for further analysis. The direction we are going to take is that how human interaction has been impacted by cyberspace. The main question being: how has the power balance changed with the pervasiveness of Cyberpsace. In that regard, we are going to explore related questions such as the future of politics in cyber space; economy in cyber space; etcetera.  A very interesting part of the course would be the incorporation the concept of power given by Michel Foucault. This will enable us to understand power in cyberspace from a critical lens.

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

After completing this course, the students should be able to;

a)      Understand / describe the changes in politics after cyberspace

b)      Learn the theoretical challenges posed by cyber space to the conventional concepts such as nation-state

c)      Speculate how politics will unfold with even greater pervasiveness of cyberspace.

 

How did/do I endeavor to achieve the course objectives?

In this course, we started off with the importance of the merger of two terms cyber and politics. Then we brought into the idea of individual autonomy. Related to that there was a discussion on how can a specific theoretical lens can help us do

 

Teaching Method:

The classes will be based on interactive lectures and discussions. Lectures will cover all important points of a topic in shape of a series of questions that will be discussed in detail. Questions, debate and discussion will be strongly encouraged in the class but before that one-sided knowledge-based lecture will be given by the teacher to avoid irrelevant discussion. The classroom will maintain a spirit of open ended conversation, respect for diversity of opinion and collaborative learning.

 

Evaluation:

Evaluation of participants’ learning will be based on the following tasks:

Collaboration Marks (10): Students should contribute to the topic by sharing their opinion. Mocking other students’ opinion will result in negative marks. Irrelevant points will also result in negative marks. The fundamental of collaboration is to maintain conducive environment in the class

Quizzes (10): There will be 2 scheduled quizzes

Presentation (group) (10): Topics will be assigned to the group of four or five. Each participant has to speak on the topic for at least two minutes. Presentation will be followed by Questions and Answers from the students and teacher.

Assignment (5) 2 tasks will be assigned either in the class or take home.

Midterm: 25

Final: 40

Total -     100

Selected Readings

Nazli C. (2012) Cyber Politics in International Relations. MIT Press

 

 

A Note on the Academic Honesty

 

It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. These policies prohibit all acts of cheating, lying, and deceit in their diverse forms. Students must especially be aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s ideas or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to talk to the resource person about it.

 

Weekly Schedule

Imp: Essential Reading for Week 1- 7: Globalization: A very short Introduction. Oxford

Week 1

Introduction to students & course

Cyber and Politics > the rational of the merger of two terms  

Week 2

History of Globalization

Individual Autonomy and Cyberspace

Week 3

Nation-state and Cyberspace

Week 4

Lateral Pressure Theory

Week 5

Kenneth Waltz and the fourth image

Week 6

 Kenneth Waltz and the fourth image

Week 7

Cyberspace and Theory matters in IR and Politics

 

Week 8

Midterm Examination

Week 9

 Case study of Australia and Facebook > analysis

Week 10 - 11

New Domains of International Relations

Week 12

New Domains of International Relations

Week 13

Cyber Content: Leveraging Knowledge and Networking

Week 14

Foucault’s concept of Power and Cyberspace

Week 15

Final Presentations

Week 16

Final Examination

 

GOVERNANCE AND DEMOCRACY IN PAKISTAN

 

 

Duration: The coursework will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Good governance emerged in the 1990s, after, as one of the most important and enduring new areas of policy and practice in development studies. Since then, a critical policy issue has been how to reform and rebuild states in the developing world, focusing on two key areas: the creation of more effective and legitimate legal, administrative, financial and policymaking institutions; and the promotion of social justice and empowerment for poor people by harnessing an active civil society. This course provides students with a theoretically informed understanding of debates on governance and democracy.

 

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a sound theoretical and practical understand of the  concept under study based on the research-based publications at the forefront of academic discipline of Political Science and Public Policy.
  • Recognize and apply relevant theoretical approaches to the study of Pakistan’s socio-political environment, by critically evaluating the key debates about good governance and democracy in Pakistan.
  • Discuss and review the role played by democratic/non-democratic institutions in the developing countries like Pakistan
  • Synthesize information (which may be conflicting in Pakistani context), evaluate academic arguments and construct persuasive analysis of contemporary debates on the role of international community in this regard.
  • Identify practical deterrents in the way of good governance in Pakistan.

 

 

 

TEACHING METHODS

           

Course will be taught by using Inquiry based learning techniques. Students will be asked to read the reading material given in advance and take an active part in discussions during the class. The evaluation will be based on a research based assignment of 2000 words followed by a class presentation, 4 quizzes, Midterm and Final Term examination. Students are required to send their assignment two weeks before the final term exams. Late submission will be marked negatively and 10% marks will be deducted. The purpose of these quizzes is to keep students engaged in learning from the very beginning and to ensure two way traffic of knowledge. On university’s prescribed dates Mid Term and Final Term Examinations will be held.

 

COURSE DURATION

           

It will run for one semester covering 15 weeks of teaching. Every week, there will be one class of three hours.

                       

Evaluation:

 

 

 

Written Assignments (2500 words)                           20 Marks

4 Group Presentations                                               10 Marks

4 (Quizzes)                                                                   10 Marks

Mid Term Exam                                                          30 Marks

Final Exam                                                                   30 Marks

 

Total                                                                            100Marks

 

 

 

COURSE POLICIES

A Note on Academic Honesty: It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. Since this class includes research component, students must also be fully aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s idea or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question or confusion about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to talk to me.

Make-up Exams and Late Assignments: There will be no make-up exams, unless there is a valid (documented) reason for not taking the scheduled exams, or prior arrangements have been made with the instructor.

 

Class Rules & Regulation: If any student misses classes more than prescribed numbers of classes by the University, he or she may not be able to appear in the Final Examination or short attendance will be treated according to the Policy of University.

 

Essential Reading:

 

 

 

COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIDNMENTS

(Note: This course schedule is subject to revisions under some unavoidable circumstances)

 

 

Week One: Introduction to the course:

 

  • What is Governance?
  • Dimensions and Elements of the Good Governance
  • Good Governance and Sustainable Development

 

 

 

 

Week 2:  Theory and Practice of Governance and Democracy in Pakistan

 

 

  • The Nature of Democracy and Governance in Pakistan : The Dynamics of Power
  • Styles of Governance: Ayub to Nawaz Sharif

 

  • Tahir Kamran  (2008)  Democracy and Governance in Pakistan, (Lahore: South Asian Partnership)
  • Rizvi, Hasan Askari (1997) The Military and Politics In Pakistan 1947-97. (Lahore:Sang-e-Meel)

 

 

Week 3: Theory and Practice of Governance and Democracy in Pakistan(Continued).

 

  • Styles of Governance: Ayub to Nawaz Sharif

 

  • Governance the External Factor

 

 

  • Tahir Kamran  (2008)  Democracy and Governance in Pakistan, (Lahore: South Asian Partnership)
  • Rizvi, Hasan Askari (1997) The Military and Politics In Pakistan 1947-97. (Lahore:Sang-e-Meel)

 

 

 

Week 4:  Decentralization and Devolution

 

 

 

Week 5: Bureaucracy: Role of Bureaucracy in implementing Good Governance

 

 

 

Week 6: Accountability and Transparency/ Judiciary: Challenges and the Way Forward

 

  • Amanullah Shah, Shadiullah and Mobina Mehsud, Analysis of Judicial Independence and Judicial Accountability in Pakistan
  • http://www.supremecourt.gov.pk/web/user_files/file/thejudicialsystemofpakistan.pdf

 

Week 7: Governance, Democracy and Media: Role of Media in Promoting Good Governance

 

 

 

 

Week 8: MIDTERM

 

 

Week 9: Good Governance and Corruption free Public Service

 

 

 

Week 10: Electoral Politics of Pakistan

 

 

 

Week 11: Women’s Political Participation for Effective Democratic Governance

 

  • Shabana Shamaas Gul KhattakAkhtar Hussain- Women Representation in Pakistani Legislatures -A Study of 2002, 2008 and 2013 General Elections
  • Rubina Saigol- Feminism and the Women’s Movement in Pakistan Actors, Debates and Strategies  - http://library.fes.de/pdf-files/bueros/pakistan/12453.pdf

 

 

Week 12: RELIGIOUS MINORITIES IN PAKISTAN

 

 

 

 

 

Week 13: Class Presentations

 

Week 14: Class Presentations

 

Week 15: Revision and Exam Discussion

 

 

Comparative Political Systems (Developed)

Course Description

The course is designed to give an understanding to the students about the functioning of the political systems and their structure. In this course efforts are made to cover the various aspects of Political Systems of France, United States of America and United Kingdom. The purpose of this course is to generate awareness among the students about the actual functioning of these political systems. This study will enable them to compare any other political system and find out the reasons of its malfunctioning and solution of various problems faced in it.

Course Objectives

  1. To gain a general overview of the competing ideas of constitutions of developed nations.
  2. To assess the various aspects of political systems of France, USA and UK.
  3. To encourage students to think independently and critically. Through the question-and-answer process, students will develop their critical thinking skills by evaluating rationally the strengths and weaknesses of various competing political systems.
  4. To appreciate better the enduring historical significance of constitutions of these countries.
  5. To develop reading comprehension skills through a close textual analysis.
  6. To enable students to compare different political systems working in the developed world.

 

Teaching Method

 

The course will be based on interactive discussions and student centered learning activities through an emphasis on both active and cooperative learning. Periodical assessment and evaluation through quizzes, mid-term and final examinations will be part of the course.

 

Quizzes: Total six quizzes would be held in which three would be taken before midterm and three after midterm examinations. No makeup of quizzes will be held. Cumulative percentage of all quizzes will be 15% of the final grade.

Research Assignments: Students are required to write “two” research assignments. Topic of the assignments should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, assignment should include atleast five articles from academic journals. This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in their assignments. These assignments will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on these assignments at their earliest, and consult me along the way to make sure that they are on the right track.

Presentation: Students are required to present their research assignments during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 2.5% of the final grade.

Exams: there will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the classroom. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the classroom by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth of 25% and final exam will be worth of 40% of the total allocated marks.

Attendance & Class Participation: students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed; class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meeting and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited to reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the class activities. Overall, combined grade for attendance and participation is 2.5% of the student’s final grade.

Course Duration

 

The course work will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

Evaluation/ Grading

 

Final                                                                40%

Mid-term                                                         25%

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Assignments                                    15%

Attendance & Class Participation                     5%

 

Course Policies

 

Failing to attend more than 6 sessions will result in automatic short attendance in the course. Punctuality and academic honesty are of the utmost importance as well. It is important that you get to class sharply on time, and stay for the entire class session.

 

Course Schedule

 

Week1-

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. Nature and Scope of Comparative Politics

 

Week2-

  1. Political System of UK: An Introduction, p. 35-38
  2. Historical Development of the State, p. 39-42

 

Week3-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 43-46
  2. Political Institution/Quiz 1, p. 47-50

 

Week4-

  1. Branches of the Government, p. 51-57
  2. Electoral System, p. 57-61

 

Week5-

  1. The Party System, p. 62-68
  2. Elections/Quiz 2, p. 69-70

 

Week6-

  1. Political System of USA: An Introduction
  2. Major Features, p. 93-96

 

Week7-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 97-106
  2. Quiz 3

 

Week8- Mid-Term

 

Week9-

  1. Political Regime, p. 106-108
  2. Branches of Government, p. 109-114
  3. Submission First Research Assignment

 

Week10-

  1. 1.      Electoral System, p. 115-118
  2. Local Government/ Quiz 4, p. 119

 

Week11-

  1. Party System, Elections, p. 120-125
  2. Political System of France: An Introduction

 

 

Week12-

  1. Major Features, p. 149-154
  2. Quiz 5

 

Week13-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 155-162
  2. Political Institutions, p. 163

 

Week14-

  1. Branches of the Government, p. 164-172
  2. Electoral System/Quiz 6, p. 173-175

 

Week15-

  1. Party Systems, p. 175-182
  2. Labour Unions and Private Enterprise, p. 183-185
  3. Submission second research assignment

 

Recommended Book

 

O’Neil, H. P., Fields, K. & Share, D (2015) Cases in Comparative Politics, New York: Norton & Company

Kesselman, M., Krieger, J. & Joseph, A. W. (2009) Introduction to Comparative Politics, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Kesselman, M., Krieger, J. & Joseph, A. W. (2010) Introduction to Comparative Politics: Political Challenges and Changing Agendas, Boston: Wadsworth Cengage Learning

 

ADVANCED POLITICAL THEORY

INTRODUCTION

This is a survey course that covers major schools, traditions, theories and approaches of Political Science. This theoretical knowledge is essential to fully understand and appreciate modern day political concepts. In other words, this is a core Political Science course that is designed to provide solid theoretical foundations to those who want to pursue their careers in Political Science and related areas. This course is divided into two parts. Part one deals with major schools and traditions of Political Science. Part two deals with key concepts that are prevalent in the field of Political Science. Theories and concepts covered in the course deal with both classical works as well as most recent theoretical advancements. By attending this course students will develop critical thinking and analytical skills that will help them to be knowledgeable observers of the societies they live in. this course also aims at enhancing students’ research as well as oral and written communication skills.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After attending this course students will:

  1. Learn about major schools, traditions and theories of Political Science.
  2. Study key political concepts in the light of major theories.
  3. Be familiar with the latest theoretical and conceptual developments in Political Science.
  4. Learn to write and present research reports in political theory.
  5. Be able to learn to critically review major theoretical works.
  6. Learn to get engaged in scholarly communication and discussion.

BOOKS REQUIRED

Mohanty, Biswaranjan (2010) Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers and Distributors Inc.

Marsh, David and Gerry Stoker, eds. (2010) Theory and Methods in Political Science, 3rd ed., New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Sarantakos, Sotiris (2005) Social Research, 3rd ed., NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

BOOKS RECOMMENDED

Almond, G. A. and S. Verba (1963) A Discipline Divided: Schools and Sects in Political Science, Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Bandyopadhyaya, J. (1973) Mao Tse-tung and Gandhi, Delhi: Allied Publishers.

Boggs, Carl (1986) Social Movements and Political Power: Emerging Forms of Radicalism in the West, Philadelpia, PA: Temple University Press.

Duncan, Graeme (1973) Marx and Mill: Two views of Social Conflicts and Social Harmony, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Dunn, John (1988) Modern Revolutions: An Introduction to the Analysis of a Political Phenomenon, 2nd ed., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Farrelly, C. (2004) An Introduction to Contemporary Political Theory, London: Sage.

Friedrich, Carl J. (2006) Man and His Government: An Empirical Theory of Politics, New Delhi: Oxford.

Held, David (1989) Political Theory and the Modern State: Essays on State, Power and Democracy, Stanford, CS: Stanford University Press.

Hojer, M. and C. Ase (1999) the Paradoxes of Politics: An introduction to Feminist Political Theory, Lund: Academia Adacta.

Huntington, Samuel P. (1968) Political Order in Changing Societies, New Heaven: Yale University Press.

Kuper, Jessica, ed. (1987) Political Science and Political Theory, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Losco, Joseph: and Leonard Williams, eds. (1992) Political Theory: Classical Writings, Contemporary Views, New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Peters, B. G. (2005) Institutional Theory in Political Science: The New Institutionalism, 2nd ed. London: Continuum.

Sandel, M (1984) Liberalism and its Critics, Oxford: Blackwell.

Schumpeter, Joseph (1942) Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy, London: George Allen & Unwin.

Smith, S., K. Booth; and M. Zalewski, eds. (1996) Positivism and Beyond, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Thucydides (1951) The Peloponnesian War, NY: Modern Library.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING

Quizzes: Students are required to give at least six quizzes during the class timings. No re-take or make-up of quiz will be held. Cumulative percentage of all quizzes would be 15 % of the total marks.

Research Paper: Students are required to write a 15-20 page research paper consisting of 5500 to 6000 words. For others, Topic of the paper should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, paper should include at least fifteen articles from academic journals (or two books and ten academic articles). This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in their papers. This paper will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on the paper at their earliest, and consult me along the way to make sure that they are on the right track.

Presentation (Research Paper): Students are required to present their research papers during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 5% of the final grade.

Exams: There will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the classroom. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the classroom by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth 25% and final exam will be worth 35% of the final grade.

Attendance & Class Participation: students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meeting and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited o reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the class activities. Overall, combined grade for attendance and participation is 5% of the student’s final grade.

GRADES SUMMARY:

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Paper                                               15%

Presentation & Viva (Research Paper)             5%

Midterm Exam                                                25%

Final Exam                                                      35%

Attendance & Class Participation                     5%

Total                                                                100%

 

COURSE POLICIES

A Note on Academic Honesty: It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. These policies prohibit acts of cheating, lying and deceit in their diverse forms. Since this class includes research component, students must also be fully aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s idea or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question or confusion about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to talk to me.

Make-up Exams and Late Assignments: There will be no make-up exams, unless there is a valid (documented) reason for not taking the scheduled exams, or prior arrangements have been made with the instructor. As of late assignments, ten percent of the grade will be deducted for each day an assignment is late. Students will also lose percentage of assignment grades if incomplete assignments are turned in.

COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIDNMENTS

(Note: This course schedule is subject to revisions under some unavoidable circumstances)

Week 1: Introduction

Part I: Major Schools, Traditions and Approaches of Political Science

Week 2: An overview of Political Science and Its Main Traditions

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Nature and Scope of Political Science” Ch.1 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp.1-41

Week 3*: Key Schools and Approaches of Political Theory, Quiz 1

[Assignment Due: Research Paper Topic (Grade: 1%)]

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Introduction to Political Theory” and “Politics” Chs. 2 and 3 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp 42-93

Week 4*: The Traditional Approach to Political Science, Quiz 2

Required Readings:

Mohanty, “State”, Chs. 4 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 94-137

Recommended Reading:

Hall, P.A, and R. Taylor (1996) “Political Science and the Three New Institutionalisms,” Political Studies, 44(4): 936-957.

Week 5*: Liberalism, Quiz 3

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Liberalism,” Chs. 9 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 246-264.

Recommended Reading:

Gutmann, A. (1985) “Communitarian Critics of Liberalism,” Philosophy and Public Affairs, 14(3): 308-322.

Week 6: Democracy and Theories of Democracy

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Democracy and Scope of Human Rights” Chs. 22 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 625-665

Week 7*: Midterm Exams

Week 8: Marxism

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Marxism” Chs. 10 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 265-329

Week 9: Socialism

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Socialism” Chs. 11 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 330-372

Week 10*: Latest Theoretical Development I: Rational Choice, Constructivism and Interpretative Theory, Quiz 4

Required Reading:

Marsh & Stoker, “Rational Choice” and “Constructivism and Interpretative Theory,” Chs. 2 and 4 in Theory and Methods in Political Science, pp.42-59; and 80-98

[Assignment Due: Research Paper (Grade: 14%)]

Week 11*: Latest Theoretical Developments II: Politics of Feminism, Quiz 5

Required Reading:

Kulkarni (ed.), “Justice, Citizenship and the Politics of Feminism”, Chs. 4 in Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Political Theory, pp. 70-86

Part II: Basic Political Concepts

Week 12*: Nationalism, Quiz 6

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Nation and Nationalism” Chs. 8 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 223- 245.

Week 13: Political Authority

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Power, Legitimacy and Authority” Chs. 5 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 138-179

Recommended Reading:

Claessen, Henry (1988) “ Changing Legitimacy,” Ronald Cohen, and Toland, eds., state formation and Political Legitimacy, New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, pp. 23-44.

Dickinson, John (1929) “Social Order and Political Authority, “American Political Science Revies, 23(2):pp. 293-328.

Horowitz. Dan (1982) “Dual Authority Polities, “Comparative Politics, 14(3):pp. 329-349.

Week 13: Democracy and Political Rights

Required Readings:

Mohanty, “Democracy and Scope of Human Rights” Ch. 22 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 666-703.

Recommended Readings:

Mohanty,” Rights,” Ch.15 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 433-462.

Week 14: Political Ideals

Required Reading:

Mohanty, “Liberty,” “Equality” and “Justice”, Chs. 16, 17 and18 in Dynamics of Political Theory: The Current Analysis, pp. 463-516

Week 15: Presentations (Research Paper)

Week 16*: Final Term Exam

*Weeks when assignments will be due or exam will be conducted.

 

 

Foreign Policy Analysis IR 640

Introduction

This subject guide provides an introduction to the field of foreign policy analysis. Foreign policy is, to use Christopher Hill’s definition, ‘purposive action with the view towards promoting the interests of a single political community or state’. The study of foreign policy is referred to as foreign policy analysis, and its focus is the intentions and actions of (primarily) states aimed at the external world and the response of other actors (again, primarily states) to these actions. This course is not designed to give you detailed exposure to the changing foreign policies of any particular country, though of course you will have many opportunities to learn about the foreign policies of major, middle and small powers through the reading material. It is aimed at giving you the tools to analyse, interpret and, ultimately, understand the dynamics of foreign policy generally so that you might apply these to your study of the role of states in international affairs.

Goals and Learning Outcomes

The aims of this course are to:

  • introduce you to the central concepts in foreign policy analysis
  • develop your comparative skills of analysis of differing foreign policies in practice
  • promote critical engagement with the foreign policy analysis literature and enable you to display this engagement by developing an ability to present, substantiate and defend complex arguments.

By the end of this course, and having completed the Essential readings and activities, you should be able to:

  • identify and assess the processes involved in foreign policy decision making
  • discuss the contexts, pressures and constraints with which foreign policy makers have to deal
  • conduct comparative analysis of foreign policy without losing sense of historical context.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING

Quizzes: Six quizzes will be held during the semester. Three quizzes will be taken before the midterm and three after the midterm. Quizzes will count for 15% of the total marks. 

Research Paper/Case Study: Students are required to write a 15-20 page research paper with word ranges from 5000 to 6000. Topic of the paper should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, paper should include at least fifteen articles from academic journals (two books and ten academic articles). This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in-depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in the class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in the paper. This paper will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on the paper at their earliest, and consult teacher of the course along the way to make sure that they are on the right track.

Presentation (Research Paper/Case Study): Students are required to present their research papers/case study during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 5% of the final grade.

Exams: There will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the class room. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the class room by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth 25% and final exam will be worth 35 % of the final grade.

Attendance & Class Participation: Students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed. Class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meetings and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited, reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the in-class activities.

Grade Evaluation Criteria

Following is the criteria for the distribution of marks to evaluate final grade in a semester.

Marks Evaluation                 Marks in percentage                                    

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Paper                                               15%

Presentation (Research Paper)                         5%

Midterm Exam                                                25%

Final Term                                                      35%

Attendance and Class Participation                  5% ______________________________________________

Total                                                                100%

 

COURSE POLICIES

A Note on Academic Honesty: It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. These policies prohibit acts of cheating, lying and deceit in their diverse forms. Since this class includes research component, students must also be fully aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s ideas or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question or confusion about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to discuss with the teacher.

Make-up Exams and Late Assignments: There will be no make-up exams, unless there is a valid (documented) reason for not taking the scheduled exams, or prior arrangements have been made with the instructor. As of late assignments, ten per cent of the grade will be deducted for each day an assignment is late. Students will also lose percentage of assignment grades if incomplete assignments are turned in.

COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS

(Note: This course schedule is subject to revisions under some unavoidable circumstances)

  1. 1.      Introduction to the Course
  2. 2.      Introduction: Foreign Policy Analysis

Required Reading:

Valerie Hudson, “Introduction: The History and Evolution of Foreign Policy Analysis”, in Foreign Policy: Theories, Actors, Cases, pp. 13-34

  1. 3.      Decision Making in Foreign Policy

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Types of Decisions and Levels of Analysis in Foreign Policy Decision making”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 15-37

  1. 4.      Levels of Analysis, Quiz 1

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Types of Decisions and Levels of Analysis in Foreign Policy Decision making”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 15-37

  1. 5.      Biases in Decision Making, Quiz 2

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Biases in Decision Making”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 38-54

  1. 6.      Models, Quiz 3

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “The Rational Actor Model”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 57-67

  1. 7.      Models

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “The Rational Actor Model”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 57-67

  1. Midterm Exams
  2. 9.      Organizational Process and Bureaucratic Politics

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Alternatives to the Rational Actor Model”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 68-93

  1. 10.  Organizational Process and Bureaucratic Politics

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Alternatives to the Rational Actor Model”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 68-93

 

  1. 11.  Factors Affecting Decisions, Quiz 4

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “Psychological Factors affecting foreign policy decisions”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 97-120

  1. 12.  Culture and National Identity, Quiz 5

Required Reading:

Alex Mintz and Karl DeRouen, “International, Domestic and Cultural factors influencing foreign policy decision making”, in Understanding Foreign Policy Decision making, pp. 121-145

  1. 13.  Domestic Politics and Opposition, Quiz 6

Required Reading:

Christopher Hill and Elisabetta Brighi, “Implementation and Behaviour” in Foreign Policy: Theories, Actors, Cases, pp. 147-166

  1. 14.  Case Studies/Debates/Presentations
  2. 15.  Case Studies/Debates/Presentations
  3. 16.  Final Term Exams

 

BOOKS REQUIRED

Hudson, M. Valerie (2014) Foreign Policy Analysis: Classic and Contemporary Theory, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield

Kahneman, Daniel (2011) Thinking, Fast and Slow, New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Smith, S. Hadfield, A. & Dunne, T. (2016) Foreign Policy: Theories, Actors, Cases, New York: Oxford University Press

Alden, C. & Aran, A. (2017) Foreign Policy Analysis: New Approaches, New York: Routledge

Mintz, A. & DeRouen, K. (2010) Understanding Foreign Policy Decision Making, New York: Cambridge University Press

 

 

 Comparative Foreign Policies of Major Powers

Course Description

The course is designed to give an understanding to the students about the foreign policies of major powers of the world. In this course efforts are made to cover the various aspects of foreign policies of India, China and Russia. The purpose of this course is to generate awareness among the students about the actual functioning of these major powers in world affairs. This study will enable them to compare differences in the conduct of international relations of these powers.

Course Objectives

  1. To enhance the understanding of international context of foreign policy making by the major powers in the international context.
  2. To evaluate the domestic context in foreign policy making by three different states.
  3. To encourage students to think independently and critically. Through the question-and-answer process, students will develop their critical thinking skills by evaluating rationally the strengths and weaknesses of various competing political systems.
  4. It provides an introduction to the patterns and processes of foreign policy making and the analytical models of foreign policy decision-making.
  5. To develop reading comprehension skills through a close textual analysis.
  6. To explore the changes and continuity in the foreign policies of the major world powers, China, Russia and India.

 

Teaching Method

 

The course will be based on interactive discussions and student centered learning activities through an emphasis on both active and cooperative learning. Periodical assessment and evaluation through quizzes, mid-term and final examinations will be part of the course.

 

Quizzes: Total six quizzes would be held in which three would be taken before midterm and three after midterm examinations. No makeup of quizzes will be held. Cumulative percentage of all quizzes will be 15% of the final grade.

Research Assignments: Students are required to write “two” research assignments. Topic of the assignments should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, assignment should include atleast five articles from academic journals. This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in their assignments. These assignments will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on these assignments at their earliest, and consult me along the way to make sure that they are on the right track. One assignment

Presentation: Students are required to present their research assignments during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 2.5% of the final grade.

Exams: there will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the classroom. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the classroom by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth of 25% and final exam will be worth of 40% of the total allocated marks.

Attendance & Class Participation: students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed; class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meeting and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited to reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the class activities. Overall, combined grade for attendance and participation is 2.5% of the student’s final grade.

Course Duration

 

The course work will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

Evaluation/ Grading

 

Final                                                                40%

Mid-term                                                         25%

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Assignments                                    15%

Attendance/Presentations                                 5%

 

Course Policies

 

Failing to attend more than 6 sessions will result in automatic short attendance in the course. Punctuality and academic honesty are of the utmost importance as well. It is important that you get to class sharply on time, and stay for the entire class session. Student would be awarded “F” for short in attendance as per university policy.

 

Course Schedule

 

Week 1- Comparative Foreign Policy: An Introduction

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. Introduction to Foreign Policy

Week 2- Russian Foreign Policy

  1. The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 38-55
  • Olga Oliker, “Russian Foreign Policy in Historical  and Current Contexts: A Reassessment” RAND Report

Week 3-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. United States: Enemy or Strategic Partner
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The United States: The main enemy or strategic partner” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 111-186
  • Martin Russell (Oct 2018) “US-Russia Relations: reaching the point of no return?” European Parliamentary Research Service

Week 4-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. Russia with Europe
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “Europe: Russia’s “Traditional Orientation” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 345-421
  • Pavel Baev (2016) “Russia and Central and Eastern Europe: between Confrontation and collusion” IFRI Report, 97

Week 5-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. 1.      Relations with South Asian states
  2. 2.      Quiz 1
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 480-519

Week 6-Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. China under Xi Jinping
  2. Quiz 2
  • Huiyun Feng & Kai He (2017) “China under Xi Jinping: Operational code beliefs, foreign policy, the rise of China” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p. 19-35

Week 7-Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. US-China Relations
  2. Quiz 3
  • Huiyun Feng & Kai He (2017) “US-China security cooperation and competition: twenty-first century considerations” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.51-61
  • Peter Ferdinand “Sino-Russian Relations: An Analytical Overview” in Russia-China Relations by FIIA Report, 30

Week 8- Mid Term Exams

Week 9- Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. China and EU Relations
  2. China and Central Asia
  • Jing Men (2017) “EU-China Security Relations” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.62-73
  • Sarah Lain (2017) “China and Russia: Cooperation and competition in Central Asia” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.74-94

Week 10-

  1. China’s Role in Asia
  • Yitzhak Shichor (2017) “Maximizing output while minimizing input: change and continuity in China’s Middle East Policy” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.109-129
  • Ian Forsyth (2017) “Games with frontiers: China and the East and South China Sea’s disputes” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.144-058

Week 11-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 4
  2. An Introduction to Indian foreign policy
  • Kanti Bajpai (2015) “Five approaches to the study of Indian foreign policy” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 21-34

Week 12-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 5
  2. 2.      Nehruvian Foreign policy
  • Andrew B. Kennedy (2015) “Nehru’s Foreign Policy: Realism and Idealism Conjoined” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 92-103

Week 13-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Post-Nehru Foreign Policy
  • Surjit Mansingh (2015) “Indira Gandhi’s Foreign policy: Hard Realism” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 104-116
  • Srinath Raghavan (2015) “At the cusp of transformation: The Rajiv Gandhi Years, 1984-1989” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 117-130

Week 14-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 6
  2. Post-Cold War and Indian Foreign Policy
  • C. Raja Mohan (2015) “Foreign Policy after 1990: transformation through incremental adaptation” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 131-144

Week 15-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. 1.      Rani D. Mullen (2015) “India’s Soft Power” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 188-204
  2. 2.      David Scott (2015) “The Indian Ocean as India’s Ocean” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 466-480

 

 

Comparative Foreign Policies of Major Powers

Course Description

The course is designed to give an understanding to the students about the foreign policies of major powers of the world. In this course efforts are made to cover the various aspects of foreign policies of India, China and Russia. The purpose of this course is to generate awareness among the students about the actual functioning of these major powers in world affairs. This study will enable them to compare differences in the conduct of international relations of these powers.

Course Objectives

  1. To enhance the understanding of international context of foreign policy making by the major powers in the international context.
  2. To evaluate the domestic context in foreign policy making by three different states.
  3. To encourage students to think independently and critically. Through the question-and-answer process, students will develop their critical thinking skills by evaluating rationally the strengths and weaknesses of various competing political systems.
  4. It provides an introduction to the patterns and processes of foreign policy making and the analytical models of foreign policy decision-making.
  5. To develop reading comprehension skills through a close textual analysis.
  6. To explore the changes and continuity in the foreign policies of the major world powers, China, Russia and India.

 

Teaching Method

 

The course will be based on interactive discussions and student centered learning activities through an emphasis on both active and cooperative learning. Periodical assessment and evaluation through quizzes, mid-term and final examinations will be part of the course.

 

Quizzes: Total six quizzes would be held in which three would be taken before midterm and three after midterm examinations. No makeup of quizzes will be held. Cumulative percentage of all quizzes will be 15% of the final grade.

Research Assignments: Students are required to write “two” research assignments. Topic of the assignments should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, assignment should include atleast five articles from academic journals. This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in their assignments. These assignments will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on these assignments at their earliest, and consult me along the way to make sure that they are on the right track. One assignment

Presentation: Students are required to present their research assignments during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 2.5% of the final grade.

Exams: there will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the classroom. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the classroom by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth of 25% and final exam will be worth of 40% of the total allocated marks.

Attendance & Class Participation: students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed; class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meeting and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited to reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the class activities. Overall, combined grade for attendance and participation is 2.5% of the student’s final grade.

Course Duration

 

The course work will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

Evaluation/ Grading

 

Final                                                                40%

Mid-term                                                         25%

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Assignments                                    15%

Attendance/Presentations                                 5%

 

Course Policies

 

Failing to attend more than 6 sessions will result in automatic short attendance in the course. Punctuality and academic honesty are of the utmost importance as well. It is important that you get to class sharply on time, and stay for the entire class session. Student would be awarded “F” for short in attendance as per university policy.

 

Course Schedule

 

Week 1- Comparative Foreign Policy: An Introduction

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. Introduction to Foreign Policy

Week 2- Russian Foreign Policy

  1. The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 38-55
  • Olga Oliker, “Russian Foreign Policy in Historical  and Current Contexts: A Reassessment” RAND Report

Week 3-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. United States: Enemy or Strategic Partner
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The United States: The main enemy or strategic partner” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 111-186
  • Martin Russell (Oct 2018) “US-Russia Relations: reaching the point of no return?” European Parliamentary Research Service

Week 4-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. Russia with Europe
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “Europe: Russia’s “Traditional Orientation” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 345-421
  • Pavel Baev (2016) “Russia and Central and Eastern Europe: between Confrontation and collusion” IFRI Report, 97

Week 5-Russian Foreign Policy

  1. 1.      Relations with South Asian states
  2. 2.      Quiz 1
  • Nikolas Gvosdev & Christopher Marsh (2014) “The Historical Legacy for Contemporary Russian Foreign Policy” in Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors, p. 480-519

Week 6-Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. China under Xi Jinping
  2. Quiz 2
  • Huiyun Feng & Kai He (2017) “China under Xi Jinping: Operational code beliefs, foreign policy, the rise of China” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p. 19-35

Week 7-Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. US-China Relations
  2. Quiz 3
  • Huiyun Feng & Kai He (2017) “US-China security cooperation and competition: twenty-first century considerations” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.51-61
  • Peter Ferdinand “Sino-Russian Relations: An Analytical Overview” in Russia-China Relations by FIIA Report, 30

Week 8- Mid Term Exams

Week 9- Chinese Foreign Policy

  1. China and EU Relations
  2. China and Central Asia
  • Jing Men (2017) “EU-China Security Relations” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.62-73
  • Sarah Lain (2017) “China and Russia: Cooperation and competition in Central Asia” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.74-94

Week 10-

  1. China’s Role in Asia
  • Yitzhak Shichor (2017) “Maximizing output while minimizing input: change and continuity in China’s Middle East Policy” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.109-129
  • Ian Forsyth (2017) “Games with frontiers: China and the East and South China Sea’s disputes” in Chinese Foreign Policy under Xi, p.144-058

Week 11-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 4
  2. An Introduction to Indian foreign policy
  • Kanti Bajpai (2015) “Five approaches to the study of Indian foreign policy” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 21-34

Week 12-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 5
  2. 2.      Nehruvian Foreign policy
  • Andrew B. Kennedy (2015) “Nehru’s Foreign Policy: Realism and Idealism Conjoined” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 92-103

Week 13-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Post-Nehru Foreign Policy
  • Surjit Mansingh (2015) “Indira Gandhi’s Foreign policy: Hard Realism” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 104-116
  • Srinath Raghavan (2015) “At the cusp of transformation: The Rajiv Gandhi Years, 1984-1989” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 117-130

Week 14-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. Quiz 6
  2. Post-Cold War and Indian Foreign Policy
  • C. Raja Mohan (2015) “Foreign Policy after 1990: transformation through incremental adaptation” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 131-144

Week 15-Indian Foreign Policy

  1. 1.      Rani D. Mullen (2015) “India’s Soft Power” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 188-204
  2. 2.      David Scott (2015) “The Indian Ocean as India’s Ocean” in The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, pp. 466-480

 

 

International Relations Theory

 

 Required Text Books:         

 

  1. 1.      Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited.
  2. 2.      Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Course Description: 

Introduction

This MPhil level course is structured around three core engagements: IR as a branch of philosophical knowledge; IR as a social science; and IR as a dimension of ‘actual existing’ world politics. The course surveys both mainstream and critical approaches to the subject, examining how these theories conceptualize ‘the international’ as a field of study. The course explicitly relates IR to cognate disciplines, reflects critically on the conceptual frameworks and modes of analysis used by IR theories, and studies the co-constitutive relationship between the theory and practice of international relations.

.

Course Aims & Objectives:            

The course has four main aims:

 

  1. To enable students to assess the contributions and shortcomings of both mainstream and critical IR theories.
  2. To interrogate how ‘the international’ has been constructed as a field of study.
  3. To connect IR with debates, both methodological and theoretical, those have been germane to the formation of social science as a whole.
  4. To demonstrate how theory provides a road map by which to examine international events and processes.

Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will:

 

  1. Evaluate the advantages and difficulties of IR theories both in comparison to each other.
  2. Discuss critically about major IR theories, relating these both to contemporary events and historical processes.
  3. Possess the means to show how theory and practice intertwine in constituting mainstream and critical IR theories.
  4. Learn how to think and write critically about key debates in contemporary IR theory.

 

Teaching Method:    

Course will be conducted on Aristotelian Method i.e., the Lecture based discussion model along with homework assignments and evaluations through quizzes, Midterm and Final Term examinations. To ensure class participation of the attendees, students will be encouraged to raise more and more questions during and after the lecture.

 

Course Duration:      It will run for one semester covering 15 weeks of teaching. Every week, there would be two classes each of one hour & 20 minutes.

 

1.         The following assignments are to be completed for this course

 

Term Paper: Every student has to write one term paper which would be submitted just before one week of midterm exam. The length of term paper should be of 7 to 10 pages with 12 font size and doubled space. Students are supposed to send the soft copies of their papers on my Email and hard copies just one week before the Mid-Term Exams. There will be no further extension in the submission date. Late sending or submission will automatically be marked negatively with the ratio of -2 marks per day. Every Term paper would be checked word by word and those who adopted the habit of cut and paste or plagiarized the material will get zero. Appreciation would be for those who will write in their own words.

2.         Quizzes:

You must be ready for 8 Quizzes. The purpose of these quizzes is to involve students in class discussion and to get their full concentration to ensure two way traffic of knowledge. Class notes will be sufficient for the preparation of the Quizzes.    

 

Mid Term and Final Term Exams: On university’s prescribed dates you will have Mid Term and End/Final Term Examinations.

 

Evaluation:

Term Paper +Presentation                                          10 Marks

Quizzes                                                                       20 Marks

Mid Term Exam                                                          30 Marks

Final Exam                                                                  40 Marks

 

Total                                                                            100Marks

 

Class Rules & Regulation: If any student misses classes more than prescribed numbers of classes by the University, he or she may not be able to appear in the Final Examination or short attendance will be treated according to the Policy of University. If you require accommodation due to personal circumstances, please contact me. Using Cell Phone is strictly prohibited in the class but if you have any emergency Phone call you can get permission to attend the Phone call. Mutual discussion in the class is not allowed and violation of the above rules can lead towards punishment.

 

Week wise Course Schedule:  Positivism/Rationalism/Explanatory Theories

 

Week 1

  1. 1.                  What is Theory

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.1-14
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.1-6

 

  1. 2.                  Development of Theory in International Relations

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited.14-21
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.7-23

 

Week 2

  1. 1.                  Liberalism/Idealism 

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.23-31
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.55-70

 

  1. 2.                   Neo-Liberalism

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.31-50
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.70-81

           

Week 3

  1. 1.                  Realism

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp. 53-74
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.30-52

 

  1. 2.                  Structuralism

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.75-101
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.30-52

 

Week 4          

  1. 1.                  Marxism and Neo Marxism

Required Reading:

  1. 1.      Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations.New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.110-135
    1. 2.                  World System Theory

Required Reading:

  1. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. 110-135

 

Week 7

  1. 1.                  Dependency Theory

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.55-70

 

  1. 2.                  Overview Before mid Term Examination

 

Week 8           Mid Term Examination

 

Post Positivism/ Reflectivist/Constitutive/Interpretive Theories

 

Week 9          

  1. 1.                  Constructivism

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.183-193

 

  1. 2.                  Limitation, Criticism & Debate

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.193-202

 

Week 10

  1. Critical Theory

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.103-128
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.137-159

 

  1. Limitation, Criticism & Debate

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.103-128
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.137-159

 

Week 11

  1. 1.                  The English School

Required Reading:

  1. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.84-108

 

  1. 2.                  Limitation, Criticism & Debate

Required Reading:

  1. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.84-108

 

 

Week 12

  1. Feminist Perspectives

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.155-170
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.213-223

 

  1. Limitation, Criticism & Debate

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.170-182
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.223-232

 

Week 13

  1. 1.                  Post Modernism

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.129-135
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.162-172

 

  1. 2.                  Limitation, Criticism & Debate

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.135-142
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.172-182

Week 14

  1. 1.                  Green Politics

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.205-215
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.235-245

 

  1. 2.                  Theory , Practice and Application

Required Reading:

  1. Stean, J., Pettiford, L., Diez, T., & El-Anis, I. (2010). An Introduction to International  Relations Theory. London: Pearson Education Limited,pp.215-230
  2. Burchill, S., Linklater, A., Deverak, R., Donnelly, J., Paterson, M., & True, J. (2005). Theories of International Relations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan,pp.245-255

 

Week 15        

  1. 1.                  Course Overview
  2. 2.                   Presentation

 

 Final Examination



 Intelligence and National Security

 

INTRODUCTION

 

This under graduate course is intended as an introduction to the study of intelligence and national security from an academic perspective. This course examines the many important roles that intelligence plays in the national security of any country. The course has three parts. Part I provides an overview of the conceptual foundations of intelligence studies, the traditional dimensions of intelligence activity and the debates about the role of secrecy and intelligence agencies. Part II explores the role of Intelligence Community in today's national security challenges, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and targeted assassinations, cyber-­- espionage, and cyber-­-warfare.

 

. TEXT BOOK REQUIRED:      

 

  1. 1.      Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press.
  2. 2.      Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing.

 

COURSE AIMS AND OBJECTIVES       

The course has four main aims:

 

  1. 1.      To develop an understanding of issues in intelligence & national security.
  2. To examine specific challenges to national security and their intelligence dimensions.
  3. To develop knowledge of the policy, legal, and ethical contexts of intelligence & national security.
  4. To apply learning through assignments that  develop written, oral, research, analytical, presentation  and other skills in individual and team environments.

 

 

TEACHING METHODS

Course will be conducted on Aristotelian Method i.e., the Lecture based discussion model along with homework assignments and evaluations through quizzes, Midterm and Final Term examinations. To ensure class participation of the attendees, students will be encouraged to raise more and more questions during and after the lecture.

 

COURSE DURATION       

It will run for one semester covering 15 weeks of teaching. Every week, there would be two classes each of one hour & 20 minutes

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING

 

1. Term Paper: Every student has to write one term paper which would be submitted just before one week of midterm exam. The length of term paper should be of 7 to 10 pages with 12 font size and doubled space. Students are supposed to send the soft copies of their papers on my Email and hard copies just one week before the Mid-Term Exams. There will be no further extension in the submission date. Late sending or submission will automatically be marked negatively with the ratio of -2 marks per day. Every Term paper would be checked word by word and those who adopted the habit of cut and paste or plagiarized the material will get zero. Appreciation would be for those who will write in their own words.

2. Quizzes:

You must be ready for 8 Quizzes. The purpose of these quizzes is to involve students in class discussion and to get their full concentration to ensure two way traffic of knowledge. Class notes will be sufficient for the preparation of the Quizzes.    

 

Mid Term and Final Term Exams: On university’s prescribed dates you will have Mid Term and End/Final Term Examinations.

 

Evaluation:

Term Paper +Presentation                                          10 Marks

Eight Quizzes                                                              20 Marks

Mid Term Exam                                                          30 Marks

Final Exam                                                                  40 Marks

 

Total                                                                            100Marks

 

COURSE POLICIES

 

A Note on Academic Honesty: It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. These policies prohibit acts of cheating, lying and deceit in their diverse forms. Since this class includes research component, students must also be fully aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s idea or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question or confusion about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to talk to me.

Make-up Exams and Late Assignments: There will be no make-up exams, unless there is a valid (documented) reason for not taking the scheduled exams, or prior arrangements have been made with the instructor. As of late assignments, ten percent of the grade will be deducted for each day an assignment is late. Students will also lose percentage of assignment grades if incomplete assignments are turned in.

Class Rules & Regulation: If any student misses classes more than prescribed numbers of classes by the University, he or she may not be able to appear in the Final Examination or short attendance will be treated according to the Policy of University. If you require accommodation due to personal circumstances, please contact me. Using Cell Phone is strictly prohibited in the class but if you have any emergency Phone call you can get permission to attend the Phone call. Mutual discussion in the class is not allowed and violation of the above rules can lead towards punishment.

 

COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIDNMENTS

(Note: This course schedule is subject to revisions under some unavoidable circumstances)

 

Part 1: Basic Concepts and Structure

 

Week 1

  1. 1.                  Introduction to Course

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p.1-4

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.1-8

 

  1. 2.                  Basic Concepts in Intelligence

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press.p. 5-10

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.9-17

 

Week 2

  1. 1.                  Intelligence and National Security

Required Reading:

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.17-29

 

  1. 2.                   Intelligence Process—Collection Disciplines

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press.p.10-15

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.30-42

 

Week 3

  1. 1.                  Intelligence Process—Analysis and Problems of Analysis

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 15-23

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.43-51

 

 

  1. 2.                  Intelligence Process—Producers, Consumers, and Politicization

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p.23-28

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.51-62

Week 4          

  1. 1.                  Intelligence Cooperation—Bilateral and Multilateral Cooperation

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press.p.28-35

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.62-69

 

  1. Intelligence Competition—Counterintelligence and the Aldrich Ames Case

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p.36-43

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.70-83

 

Week 7

  1. 1.                  Intelligence Competition—Denial, Deception, and Surprise

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 43-60

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.83-97

 

  1. Overview Before mid Term Examination

Week 8           Midterm Examination

 

Part 2

Week 9          

  1. 1.                  Oversight of the Intelligence Community and Accountability

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 61-73

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 98-102

 

  1. 2.                  Secrecy and Unauthorized Disclosures

Required Reading: Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p.74-85

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.103-111

Week 10

  1. 1.      Rendition, Torture, and Interrogation

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 85-95

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 112-119

 

  1. 2.      Cyber Espionage and Cyber Warfare

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. 96-110

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.220-231

Week 11

  1. 1.                  UAVs and Targeted Killings

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 115-220

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 232-241

 

  1. 2.                  UAVs and Targeted Killings

 

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p115- 125

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 243-251

 

Part 3: Contemporary Issues in Intelligence and Counter Intelligence

 

 

Week 12

  1. The 9/11 Attacks and Strategic Surprise

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 130-148

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 253-260

 

  1. Intelligence and the 2003 Iraq

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 150-163

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 261-273

Week 13

  1. 1.                  Intelligence and the Iranian Nuclear Program (2002-­-2015)

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 164-176

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 274-280

 

  1. 2.                  Intelligence and the Iranian Nuclear Program (2002-­-2015)

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 178-188

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.281-290

 

Week 14

  1. 1.                  Relationship between the Intelligence and Foreign Policy

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p.190-210

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p. 292-300

 

  1. 2.                  Impact of Foreign Policy and Intelligence Operations

Required Reading:

Mark, M. L. (2015). Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. p. 211-225

Johnson, L. K., & Wirtz, J. J. (2004). Strategic Intellegence:Windows into a Secret World. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. p.301-315

 

Week 15        

  1. 1.                  Course Overview
  2. 2.                   Presentation

 

 Final Examination

 

 Comparative Political Systems (Developed)

Course Description

The course is designed to give an understanding to the students about the functioning of the political systems and their structure. In this course efforts are made to cover the various aspects of Political Systems of France, United States of America and United Kingdom. The purpose of this course is to generate awareness among the students about the actual functioning of these political systems. This study will enable them to compare any other political system and find out the reasons of its malfunctioning and solution of various problems faced in it.

Course Objectives

  1. To gain a general overview of the competing ideas of constitutions of developed nations.
  2. To assess the various aspects of political systems of France, USA and UK.
  3. To encourage students to think independently and critically. Through the question-and-answer process, students will develop their critical thinking skills by evaluating rationally the strengths and weaknesses of various competing political systems.
  4. To appreciate better the enduring historical significance of constitutions of these countries.
  5. To develop reading comprehension skills through a close textual analysis.
  6. To enable students to compare different political systems working in the developed world.

 

Teaching Method

 

The course will be based on interactive discussions and student centered learning activities through an emphasis on both active and cooperative learning. Periodical assessment and evaluation through quizzes, mid-term and final examinations will be part of the course.

 

Quizzes: Total six quizzes would be held in which three would be taken before midterm and three after midterm examinations. No makeup of quizzes will be held. Cumulative percentage of all quizzes will be 15% of the final grade.

Research Assignments: Students are required to write “two” research assignments. Topic of the assignments should fall within the framework of the concepts covered in the class. At the minimum, assignment should include atleast five articles from academic journals. This is a minimum requirement and by no means should be taken as a limit. Those students who wish to get a better grade would consider more in depth study of their topics. Students may also cite materials covered in class or sources like newspaper articles and other non-academic journals to boost their arguments in their assignments. These assignments will count for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to start working on these assignments at their earliest, and consult me along the way to make sure that they are on the right track.

Presentation: Students are required to present their research assignments during allotted times. Presentation time is 15 minutes, followed by a question-answer session. Students will be graded based on content, organization, and manner of presentation, as well as their participation in question-answer sessions, both as presenters and audience. This assignment will be worth 2.5% of the final grade.

Exams: there will be two exams in this class, a midterm and a final. These exams will be closed book and conducted in the classroom. Exams will be based on assigned readings, class discussions, lectures and any other learning activities done in the classroom by the exam date. Midterm exam will be worth of 25% and final exam will be worth of 40% of the total allocated marks.

Attendance & Class Participation: students are required to come to class regularly. Attendance will be taken in each class. University policy on attendance will be followed; class participation is also a vital part of this class. Students are required to read the assigned material prior to the class meeting and come prepared to take part in the discussion and learning activities related to that material. Participation includes, but not limited to reading the assigned material for the class, asking questions about the day’s readings, answering questions raised by the instructor, spontaneously responding to the on-going discussion in the class, and taking part in the class activities. Overall, combined grade for attendance and participation is 2.5% of the student’s final grade.

Course Duration

 

The course work will comprise of 15 weeks of instruction, with one session reserved for the mid-term examination.

 

Evaluation/ Grading

 

Final                                                                40%

Mid-term                                                         25%

Quizzes                                                           15%

Research Assignments                                    15%

Attendance & Class Participation                     5%

 

Course Policies

 

Failing to attend more than 6 sessions will result in automatic short attendance in the course. Punctuality and academic honesty are of the utmost importance as well. It is important that you get to class sharply on time, and stay for the entire class session.

 

Course Schedule

 

Week1-

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. Nature and Scope of Comparative Politics

 

Week2-

  1. Political System of UK: An Introduction, p. 35-38
  2. Historical Development of the State, p. 39-42

 

Week3-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 43-46
  2. Political Institution/Quiz 1, p. 47-50

 

Week4-

  1. Branches of the Government, p. 51-57
  2. Electoral System, p. 57-61

 

Week5-

  1. The Party System, p. 62-68
  2. Elections/Quiz 2, p. 69-70

 

Week6-

  1. Political System of USA: An Introduction
  2. Major Features, p. 93-96

 

Week7-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 97-106
  2. Quiz 3

 

Week8- Mid-Term

 

Week9-

  1. Political Regime, p. 106-108
  2. Branches of Government, p. 109-114
  3. Submission First Research Assignment

 

Week10-

  1. 1.      Electoral System, p. 115-118
  2. Local Government/ Quiz 4, p. 119

 

Week11-

  1. Party System, Elections, p. 120-125
  2. Political System of France: An Introduction

 

 

Week12-

  1. Major Features, p. 149-154
  2. Quiz 5

 

Week13-

  1. Historical Development of the State, p. 155-162
  2. Political Institutions, p. 163

 

Week14-

  1. Branches of the Government, p. 164-172
  2. Electoral System/Quiz 6, p. 173-175

 

Week15-

  1. Party Systems, p. 175-182
  2. Labour Unions and Private Enterprise, p. 183-185
  3. Submission second research assignment

 

Recommended Book

 

O’Neil, H. P., Fields, K. & Share, D (2015) Cases in Comparative Politics, New York: Norton & Company

Kesselman, M., Krieger, J. & Joseph, A. W. (2009) Introduction to Comparative Politics, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Kesselman, M., Krieger, J. & Joseph, A. W. (2010) Introduction to Comparative Politics: Political Challenges and Changing Agendas, Boston: Wadsworth Cengage Learning 

 

 

 

Course Title: Introduction to Political Science

Essential Reading: Mazher ul Haq-‘Political Science: Theory and Practice’,  Bookland Private Limited, Urdu Bazhar, Lahore.

 

Course Description

This introductory course seeks to provide a comprehensive overview of key conceptual and thematic elements of political science. Students will gain knowledge of the scope of political science and understand how the discipline studies power relations in diverse social settings. The course takes a comparative approach while studying different functions and systems of government. Along with advanced western democratic systems, governmental frameworks in developing countries will also be explored.

 

Course Objectives

Students should be able to

  • Develop a comparative understanding of real-world politics
  • Appreciate the diversity in systems of government
  • Recognize the best-practices evolved over millennia

 

 

Class Attendance and Participation

Students must adhere to the university policy on class attendance; if a formal leave has not been obtained, exceeding the allowed number of absences will result in the termination of course registration. Moreover, if students fail to participate in any assigned class activity, and/or fail to maintain discipline during class, they will be penalized for the same in the assessment component for ‘class participation’.

 

Grade Summary

 

Presentation                            10

4 Quizzes before mid-term      4*2.5=10Marks

Mid-Term Exam                      30

4 Quizzes after Mid                 4*2.5=10Marks

End-Term Exam                      :40

________________________________

Total                                        : 100

 

Course Schedule

 

Week 01: The Nature and Scope of Political Science

 

  • An Introduction to Political Science.
  • Evolution of Political Science.
  • Scope of Political Science.

 

Week 02: The Nature, origin and Evolution of the State

 

  • Element of a State
  • Theories of the origin of the State

 

Week 03:Forms of Governments:

 

  • Parliamentary,
  • Presidential and

 

Week 04: Sovereignty

  • Attributes of Sovereignty
  • Kinds of Sovereignty

 

 

Week 05 Democracy:

  • Totalitarian Patterns
  • What is democracy?
  • How can we measure it?

 

Week 06: The Structure of Government

 

  • The Legislature
  • The Executive
  • The Judiciary
  • Separation of powers and check and balance in practice

 

Week 07: Levels of Government: Centralization/ Decentralization

 

  • Unitary and Federal System
  • Regionalism and Local Government

 

 

Week 08: Exam Discussion

 

 

            ***MID-TERM EXAM***

 

 

 

Week 9: International Relations: Study of Political Phenomena Between States

 

  • Approaches to International Relations

           

 

Week 10: Political Ideologies

 

  • Conservatism, Liberalism, Socialism and Fascism     

 

Week 11: International Organisation

 

  • International Organisation and World States

 

Week 12:  Political Participation

 

  • Election and Voting
  • Representation
  • Origin and development of Political parties/Types of parties

 

Week 13: Individual and the State

 

  • Relation between the Individual and the State
  • Law and Morality
  • Rights and Duties
  • Fundamental Rights in Islam
  • Rights of Minorities

 

Week 14: Political Dynamics

 

  • Public Opinion
  • Pressure Groups
  • Propaganda
  • Political Parties

 

Week 15: 

Exam Discussion

How to write?

 

***END-TERM EXAM***

 

Readings: Recommended Readings

 

 

 

  • Ethridge, M. E. and Handleman, H. (2004).Politics in a Changing World: A Comparative Introduction to Political Science.London: Thomason Wardsworth.

 

  • Grigsby, E. (2009). Analysing Politics: An Introduction To Political Science. London: Wadsworth.

 

  • Munroe, T. (2002). An Introduction to Politics: Lectures For First Year Student.Barbadoes:  Canoe Press.

 

  • Tansey, S. D.(2004). Politics: The Basics London: Routledge.

 Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution      

 

 

Introduction:

 

Peace and Conflict Studies or Peace Studies is a vast trans-disciplinary domain. This course aims to explore selective aspects of Peace Studies that relate to International Relations theoretical and historical context. The course is divided into two parts. The first part discusses the idea of peace in International Relations through different stages of contemporary history. The second part explores deeper roots of the present structural, cultural and personal violence. The colonial history of the modern world, the existing Coloniality and epistemic violence will be discussed in some detail. Then the focus will be shifted to the problem of peace in post 9/11 world. Discourses of Terrorism, Counter terrorism, Extremism, Counter extremism and their connection to Peace Studies will be explored. Towards the end the course I shall emphasize the need to expand the scope of Peace Studies, to include more critical, indigenous insights to the field in order to make it more effective for a peaceful global future. 

Learning Outcomes:

 

After completion of the course, the participants should be able to;

a)      Recognize multiple conceptions of peace and key peace terminology 

b)      Understand the historical evolution of Peace Studies and its connection with Security Studies

c)      Recap how foundational debates in International Relations discuss the problem of peace

d)      Recognize how Marxist and Critical Perspectives in International Relations view the problem of peace

e)      Appreciate Johan Galtung’s contribution to Peace Studies

f)       Recognize contemporary Decolonial and Post-colonial perspectives on structural, cultural  and historical violence embedded in modernity

g)      Critically analyze post 9/11 Terrorism and Counter terrorism discourse

h)      Trace the evolution and connection of Critical Terrorism Studies and Peace Studies

i)       Critically read, reflect and evaluate multiple perspectives on peace and security.

j)       Critically assess contemporary Peace and Conflict Studies academic discourse

 

Teaching Method:

The class will be divided into three sessions; interactive lecture, reading based task and participants’ presentation on home assignment. Interactive lectures will usually begin with a starter activity that invites thinking. Lectures will cover important points of a topic in shape of a series of questions / discussion points. In the second session participants will be assigned reading based tasks, they will summarize and discuss main points of the topic. In the third session students will submit their home assignment and give a formal presentation on it. Questions, debate and discussions are strongly encouraged in the class. The classroom will maintain a spirit of open ended conversation, respect for diversity of opinion and collaborative learning.

The resource person shall take on the role of a facilitator in learning rather than that of a traditional instructor. Since you are aiming for a ‘doctorate of philosophy’ degree, you have to be trained to think and question deeper like a philosopher. Hence, the purpose of teaching in this course is not just to throw information at you but to train you to think and reflect critically.

Learning Method

 

Throughout the course you are expected to rigorously indulge in the circular process of learning that may involve the following tasks;

-          Collect/ Access Information

-          Read and Reflect ( a lot of reading,  skim reading, critical reading)

-          Summarize main ideas , identify themes

-          Maintain a note book / file – keep a systematic record of your reading, reflections/ ideas/ suggestions

-          Evaluate multiple perspectives on a given issue

-          Collect and organize ideas , methods, findings , your thoughts

-          Select , Discard, Organize Information

-          Develop your own perspective

-          Write and Review

-          Present

Also please note that ‘unlearning’ is an essential part of the learning process. You should be willing to embrace new ideas and consider fresh perspectives. Moreover, always be very honest with your academic pursuits and be willing to say ‘I don’t know’ whenever needed

 

Evaluation:

Evaluation of participants’ learning will be based on the following tasks;

Weekly Reading Based Assignment: Critical Reflection / Individual Presentations –

20 (10+10)

Each student will maintain weekly record of notes/ critical reflections based on essential reads. Students will be present their work by rotation each week – 5 students in each class. 10 marks will be based on a) notes record b) presentations

[average marks will be added towards end of midterm (10) and final term (10)- absents will be marked 0/10 – only one exception is allowed in each half – lowest marks Or 1 absent will be deleted from the total]

Group Project (Group size 3):  a) Short Documentary and b) a written report with references and citations, on a contemporary Conflict / Resistance or Social Change movement / Peace Ideas/ Peace Organizations/ Peace problem of your choice (20 marks total– 10 for documentary, 10 for written report)

Midterm: 25

Final: 35

Total -     100

A Note on Flexibility

 

The weekly schedule outlined below will be followed most of the time, however some flexibility to this schedule and outline may be allowed as the course develops. Some relevant readings/ activities may be added to the outline if and when required.

 

A Note on the Academic Honesty

 

It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. These policies prohibit all acts of cheating, lying, and deceit in their diverse forms. Students must especially be aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s ideas or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to talk to the resource person about it.

 

Weekly Schedule

Note: Selected Readings are essential readings to be read , summarized and reflected upon each week.

Week 1

The Idea of Peace

The Nature of Peace Studies/ Peace and Conflict Studies

             

 

Week 2

Peace Studies , Security Studies and Conflict Resolution; Convergences and Divergences  

 

A Brief Historical Sketch

 

Week 3

Peace in International Relations-1

Liberal and Realist Perspectives on Peace

 

 

Week 4

Peace in International Relations- 2

Marxist and Critical Perspectives on Peace

 

 

Week 5

Peace in International Relations- 3

Broader Critical Perspectives on Peace

 

Week 6

Peace in International Relations- 3

Broader Critical Perspectives on Peace

 

Week 7

Peace in International Relations- 4

Johan Gatlung’s perspective on Peace

 

 

Week 8

 

Midterm Examination

 

Week 9

Peace in International Relations- 5

End of History , Clash of Civilizations

 

 

 

 

Week 10

Colonialism , Coloniality and the Decolonial Option

Context : Deeper , historical roots of contemporary structural, cultural, personal violence

 

 

 

Week 11

Epistemic Violence and Epistemic Disobedience

-          Theory located in the North – while subjects to be studies located in South

-          Power knowledge nexus- questioning construction of knowledge and disciplines

 

 

Week 12

Terrorism , Counter Terrorism and Critical Terrorism Studies  

Context : Post 9/11 World- Global War on Terror

 

 

Week 13

Extremism and Counter extremism

Context : Post 9/11 World- Global War on Terror

 

 

Week 14

Peace Education and Critical Pedagogy

 

 

 

Week 15

 

Project Presentations

 

 

Week 16

Final Examination

 

Selected Readings:

-          ‘Shaping a vision: The nature of Peace Studies’, Conrad G. Brunk  In Peace and Conflict Studies: A Reader, Edited by Charles P. Webel and Jorgen Johansen.2012

-         Peace and Security: Two Evolving Concepts and Their Changing Relationship

             Ole Wæver in Globalization and Environmental Challenges , p 99

-                      Jackson, Richard, Georg Sørensen, and Jørgen Møller. Introduction to international relations: theories and approaches. Oxford University Press, USA, 2019.

( Soft form – Chapter 2 - Focus on First Debate in IR)

-          Richmond, O.P. (2008). Peace in International Relations. Routledge , Chapter 1 – Peace and the Idealist Tradition

-         Critical Theorists and International Relations. Chapter 23 Marxism

-          Richmond, O.P. (2008). Peace in International Relations. Routledge , Chapter 3

 

-          Paulo Freire - Pedagogy of the Oppressed

-          I Have a Dream. Speech by Martin Luther King. 1963

What is an Emancipatory Peace? Oliver P. Richmond

Paulo Freire (1921–1997), Conceptual Tools, Philosophy of Education, Criticism. https://education.stateuniversity.com/pages/1998/Freire-Paulo-1921-1997.html

Paulo Freire's Educational Theory. https://www.newfoundations.com/GALLERY/Freire.html

Anna Verhoye (2017) Connecting peace, justice & reconciliation, Journal of Peace Education, 14:3, 371-373, DOI: 10.1080/17400201.2017.1388075

-          Violence, Peace and Peace Research. Johan Galtung. 1969 . Journal of Peace Research

-          Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order. Samuel P. Huntington.1993

-          Clash of Ignorance. Edward Said

-          Revisiting Fukuyama: The End of History, the Clash of Civilizations, and the Age of Empire by Chan-young Yang. 2010

-          The Roots of Muslim Rage. Bernard Lewis. 1990

-          Esposito, John L. The Islamic threat: Myth or reality? Oxford University Press, 1999

-           ‘Positive and Negative Peace’, Johan Galtung In Peace and Conflict Studies: A Reader, Edited by Charles P. Webel and Jorgen Johansen.2012

 

-          Johan Galtung Theories of conflict Definitions, Dimensions, Negations, Formations

-          Galtung, Theories of Peace (pp. 12-17) - Positive and Negative Peace

 

 

 

 

Recommended Readings

-          Peace Terms: Glossary of Terms for Conflict Management and Peacebuilding , USIP pdf.

-          Richmond, O.P. (2008). Peace in International Relations. Routledge.

-          The Evolution of the Concept of International, Peace and Security in light of UN Security Council Practice (End of the Cold War-Until Now) Rasool Soltani, Maryam Moradi

-         Peace History: An Introduction* PETER VAN DEN DUNGEN Department of Peace Studies, University of Bradford

-          International Relations Theory. E International Relations

-          A long view of liberal peace and its crisis , David Rampton (LSE, Univ. of London) & Suthaharan Nadarajah (SOAS, Univ. of London)

-          Coloniality: The Darker Side of Modernity, Walter Mignolo

-          Decolonizing Post-Colonial Studies and Paradigms of Political-Economy: Trans-modernity, Decolonial Thinking, and Global Coloniality

-          On Decoloniality, Walter Mignolo & Catherine Walsh. 2018

-          

 

 

Contemporary Debates in International Relations

 

 

Introduction:

International Relations is a dynamic field with a rich tradition of theoretical debates on multiple issues including war , peace, security, economic disparity, inequality and injustice. Covering wide-ranging theoretical debates in International Relations is not possible within the short span of this course, however a careful selection of old and new debates have been made to give participants a flavor of vigorous IR theoretical field. The course begins with an overview of foundational debates and mainstream theoretical contestations in IR. It then moves on to examine critique on mainstream perspectives and explores critical methodologies in the field. After the midterm, the course focuses on Post-Colonial, De-colonial, Non Western perspectives in IR. It also explores a major non Western perspective i.e. Islam in IR. Towards the end, the course examines new discussions on International Relations beyond humanity.  In general, an effort has been made throughout the course to reflect and embrace the complexity of theorizing the International.

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

After taking this course the students are expected to;

-          Clearly recognize the established theoretical debates in IR ;

-          Understand critique on mainstream IR perspectives ;

-          Be familiar with critical epistemologies and methods in IR;

-          Recognize post-colonial , decolonial and non-Western perspectives in IR;

-          Make sense of the role of Islam in contemporary world politics;

-          Understand the debates on race, class and gender in IR

-          Develop a well thought out research problem and theoretical framework for PhD dissertation

-          Develop a brief tentative methodology for PhD dissertation

 

Teaching Method:

The first class will employ methods to assess student’s prior knowledge of the subject matter. The teaching method for this course may vary in accordance with student’s response and feedback. The original plan is to divide the class into three sessions; interactive lecture, reading based task and participants’ presentation on home assignment. Interactive lectures will usually begin with a starter activity that invites thinking. Lectures will cover important points of a topic in shape of a series of questions / discussion points. In the second session participants will be assigned reading based tasks, they will summarize and discuss main points of the topic. In the third session students will submit their home assignment and give a formal presentation on it. Questions, debate and discussions are strongly encouraged in the class. The classroom will maintain a spirit of open ended conversation, respect for diversity of opinion and collaborative learning. The resource person shall take on the role of a facilitator in learning rather than that of a traditional instructor.

 

Learning Method

 

Throughout the course you are expected to rigorously indulge in the circular process of learning that may involve the following tasks;

-          Collect/ Access Information

-          Read and Reflect ( a lot of reading,  skim reading, critical reading)

-          Summarize main ideas , identify themes

-          Maintain a note book / file – keep a systematic record of your reading, reflections/ ideas/ suggestions

-          Evaluate multiple perspectives on a given issue

-          Collect and organize ideas , methods, findings , your thoughts

-          Select , Discard, Organize Information

-          Develop your own perspective

-          Write and Review

-          Present

Also please note that ‘unlearning’ is an essential part of the learning process. You should be willing to embrace new ideas and consider fresh perspectives. Moreover, always be very honest with your academic pursuits and be willing to say ‘I don’t know’ whenever needed. I am in it with you. I expect a very open but responsible conversation in the class.

 

Evaluation:

Evaluation of participants’ learning will be based on the following tasks;

Weekly Reading Based Assignment: Critical Reflection / Quiz/ Group Presentation – 20 (10+10)

[average marks will be added towards end of midterm (10) and final term (10)- absents will be marked 0/10 – only one exception is allowed in each half – lowest marks Or 1 absent will be deleted from the total]

-          Each student is required to keep his/her assessment record with dates including missing assessments list – peer or self- checked marking + teachers’ evaluation/comments

 

-          This record has to be presented twice in Week 7 and Week 14 to get your score out of 10+10.

 Project (Individual): Develop a) well-crafted research problem (statement of the problem) and b) theoretical framework with c) tentative methodology.

15 marks for final project presentation and submission of a) b) c) d) in Week 15).

 

Midterm: 25

Final: 40

Total -     100

A Note on Flexibility

 

The weekly schedule outlined below will be followed most of the time, however some flexibility to this schedule will be accommodated as the course develops. Some relevant readings may be added to the given outline if and when required.

 

A Note on the Academic Honesty

 

It must be emphasized that university policies on academic dishonesty will be strictly followed. These policies prohibit all acts of cheating, lying, and deceit in their diverse forms. Students must especially be aware of plagiarism. Plagiarism involves presenting someone else’s ideas or written work as your own, without giving proper citation and credit to the original source. If you still have any question about academic dishonesty, please do not hesitate to talk to the resource person about it.

 

Selected Readings:

-         Jackson, Richard, Georg Sørensen, and Jørgen Møller. Introduction to international relations: theories and approaches. Chapter 2 , 3, 4

-         International Relations Theories: Discipline and Diversity. Tim Dunne, Milja Kurki, Steve Smith , Chapter 3, 4, 5, 6

-         A Critical Analysis of ‘the Great Debates’ that Structured Traditional International Relations Theory. Niall Mc Arthy. 2009. E International

-          Alternative History of IR- Ringmar, Erik. “Introduction,” History of International Relations, Open Book Publishers, Cambridge, 2017.

-          Where are the idealists in Inter war International Relatios? Lucian M. Ashworth.

-          Interruption Ashley by CYNTHIA WEBER

-         Theory, History, and the Global Transformation by Barry Buzan and George Lawson

-          Theory is dead, long live theory: The end of the Great Debates and the rise of

eclecticism in International Relations , David A. Lake. 2013

 

-          Critical Security Studies and the Deconstruction of Realist Hegemony. David Robinson. 2010.

 

-         The End of International Relations Theory? Tim Dunne , Lene Hansen and Colin Wight.2013

-          Social Forces, State and World Orders: Beyond International Relations Theory. Robert W. Cox. 1981

-          Chapter 3 , The Empty Neighbourhood: Race and Disciplinary Silence  In Routledge Handbook of Critical International Relations ( Hard form)

-          Chapter 11- Applying IR Theory In Making Sense of International Relations Theory. Jennifer Sterling Folker (Ed). 2015 ( Hard Form)

-          Decolonizing both researcher and research and its effectiveness in Indigenous

Research. Ranjan Datta

-          Advancing Global IR: Challenges, Contentions, and Contributions, AMITAV ACHARYA

 

Recommended Readings

-          International Relations Theory. E International Relations

-          Making Sense of International Relations Theory. Jennifer Sterling Folker (Ed). 2015

-          International Relations Theory: A Critical Introduction. Cynthia Weber.

-          The Third Debate: On the Prospects of International Theory in a Post-Positivist Era , Yosef Lapid. International Studies Quarterly, Vol. 33, No. 3 (Sep., 1989), pp. 235-254

-          Making Sense of International Relations Theory. Jennifer Sterling Folker (Ed). 2015

International Relations Theory: A Critical Introduction. Cynthia Weber

-          Adorno, Foucault, and the End of Progress: Critical Theory in Postcolonial Times

Amy Allen in Critical Theory in Critical Times, ed. Penelope Deutscher and Cristina Lafont, Columbia University Press

-          Qualitative Methods in International Relations: A Pluralist Guide. 2008.

-          Re?exivity in Qualitative Research: A Journey of Learning.2017

-          Encountering the Pluriverse: Looking for Alternatives in Other Worlds.2016

 

 

 

 

 

Weekly Schedule

Week 1

The Great Debates in International Relations – An Overview

             

-           

Week 2

‘The Fourth Debate’ – Established Traditions vs. New Voices (Post Positivism)

 

 

 

 

Week 3

A Critical Analysis of ‘the Great Debates’ in IR

Alternative History of IR

 

Week 4

The End of International Relations Theory?

Deconstruction of Realist Hegemony in IR

 

 

Week 5

 

Critical Theory and International Relations

 

 

Week 6

Critical and Reflexive Methodologies in International Relations

 

 

Week 7

Project Update (5 marks)

Critical Methodological Turn in IR

 

 

 

Week 8 – Midterm Examination

Week 9

-          Decolonizing Methodologies

-          Advancing Global IR

 

Week 10

-          Post- Colonial Perspectives in IR

 

 

Week 11

Non Western Perspectives in IR

 

 

Week 12

Islam in Contemporary International Relations

 

 

Week 13

Islam in Contemporary International Relations

 

Week 14

 International Relations Beyond Humanity?

 

 

 

Week 15

 

Project Submission and Presentations (15 marks)

 

 

Week 16

Final Examination

 

MPhil Course: Strategic Studies                               

 

Introduction:

Strategy is a contested term as it’s meanings are specific to the fulfillment of objectives. These objectives when related to the military field it becomes strategic studies and if it involves marketing objective then it becomes a marketing strategy. In this course we will be studying strategy both a mean to grand objective and also as an independent field of inquiry subservient to its own dynamics. Strategic studies is the subfield on security studies which itself is the subset of International relations and it deals with the subject of conduct of war (used both in actual and hypothetical sense). How war is conducted throughout history as well as during contemporary times? What strategies are employed at war board rooms and what tactics are used the battlefield? What is the role of grand strategy and how war strategy becomes part of this strategy? Here it is important to identify that war is not an end itself it is rather used as a mean to achieve other political ends.  These are some of the relevant question which this course offers. War or to fight with others is an intrinsic part of human mind. From the first human blood drawn on this earth to the horrific carnage experienced during the world wars, their capacity to wage war is unrelenting and untethered too. In this course we will be studying the strategies evolved for the conduction of war both by the theorists as well as by the actual Generals on the battle field. Along with it we will also traverse the strategic thinking of at-least two well-known thinkers who wrote on strategy amongst Thucydides, Clausewitz, Kutaliya, Sun Tsu. Another salient feature of this course is a comparative analysis of Western conduct of war with that of an Islamic one especially espoused by the Holy Prophet Peace be upon him during the Holy wars like digging up of trenches in Ghazwa-e-Khandaq, placement of bowmen at Uhad mountain in Ghazw-e-Uhad.

Course strategy:

 This course is interactive based with less emphasis on formal lecturing and more focus on student participation and discussion. There will be mandatory readings given prior to each session and the subsequent interactive session will be done in the class. The Moodle will be used extensively for reading material as well as for interaction. The strategy is to cover ancient texts as well as contemporary resource material with deliberation and question answer sessions. Some of the session specially those explaining Hitler strategic thinking will be covered on You tube videos. There are explicit three sections of this course. Section A relates to the theoretical framework and the terminology involved in studying strategic studies which of course is heavily loaded from a Western perspective of International Relations. It will also explain the philosophy of Sun Tzu, Clausewitz. Section B will be covering the Islamic perspective of war strategy and particularly the understanding of Jihad from the Holy Quran and Sunnah as well as from contemporary Islamic philosophers like Mawdudi, Qutb and some medieval philosophers like Frabi, Ibn Khuldun. Section C will be regional specific and particularly we will be focusing on nuclear armed countries of South Asia, India and Pakistan and what strategies they are devising for war against each other.

 

 

Topics to be covered in Section A

  • War: The concept of war in modern day times, the philosophy of war and the rapidly changing characteristics of war.
  • Strategy in the contemporary times: definitions and conceptual definitions, relationship between Strategic Studies and Security Studies. The impact of 9/11 and the rapidly changing face of strategy from conventional war, Gorilla warfare to full blown insurgencies and urban warfare.
  • Historical Background: History of Strategy in the Greek period, Western European Middle Ages, Early modern Europe, American War of Independence, Napoleonic war.
  • Modern war-fare and Strategy: The Napoleonic Legacy, Industrial revolution and its impact on strategic thinking, Rise of Naval warfare in 20th century and its influence on colonial strategy, Concept of Total War, Rise of Nuclear Weapons technology and revolutionary wars, Post Modern wars.
  • Strategic Theory: analysis of the strategic writings of Holy Prophet Peace be Upon him, Sun-Tzu and Clausewitz, Mao, Hitler and Mawdudi.
  • Strategic Culture: What is strategic culture and how it can be empirically used to explain the strategic decision of elites. link between strategy and culture, sources of strategic culture, political ideologies and strategic behavior, Keepers of strategic culture.
  • The causes of war and Conditions of Peace: Misperceptions and perceptions, media role, war within and between states.
  • Intelligence and deterrence, Law politics and the Use of Force: The linkage between international law and strategy.
  • Terminologies: Hybrid wars, generational warfare, first strike, second strike capabilities, game theory, and deterrence.   
  • Role of International Law and Strategic: Hague law and Geneva Law, Jus in Bello, Jus ad bellum. Technology and Warfare: the change of technology and the future of warfare strategy with criticism.
  • Land, sea and Air strategies in warfare along with discussion of contemporary topics like insurgencies and cyber warfare.

 

B. Philosophical foundations (Islamic and Western)

  • Grand Strategy: Concept of Grand Strategy as explained by Liddell Hart
  • Classical texts of Strategy: Documentary analysis of some philosophers both Western and Islamic who have written on strategy like Strategy devised by the Holy prophet during Badr, Oud and Khandaq, Chinese scholar Sun Tzu, Prussian (German) diplomat Carl Von Clausewitz, Islamic scholars like Mawdudi of Pakistan and Syed Qutb of Egypt

 

C. Regional Strategies of India and Pakistan

  • Case Study of Indian Cold Start doctrine.
  • First strike capabilities and Second Strike capability of Pakistan and India respectively.
  • Strategic Culture of India and the role of Ideology.

 

Relevant books and articles

 

  • Security Studies: An introduction, Third Edition, 2018 edited by Paul D Williams and Matt McDonald, Routledge, New York.
  • Strategy in the Contemporary World, Fifth Edition, 2016, edited by John Baylis, Wirtz and Gray, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  • Carl Von Clausewitz, On War, Edited by Michael Howard, 1993, Everyman’s Library, London.
  • The Art of Strategy, Sun Tzu translated by R.L. Wing, the American Press, London, 1988.
  • Strategy, B.H. Liddell Hart, second edition, 1970, a Meridian book, Penguin, London
  • Strategic Culture (re)-conceptualized: The case of India and BJP, M.S. Pervez, International Politics, 2019 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/s41311-017-0142-9
  • A cold start for hot wars: The Indian enemy new Limited war Doctrine, Walter C Ladwig, International Security, 2008 https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/isec.2008.32.3.158
  • Strategy of Conflict, Thomas Schelling, 1968, Yale University Press.
  • Modern Military Strategy: an Introduction by Elionor C Sloan, Routledge, New York, 2012.
  • http://www.journal.forces.gc.ca/vol14/no2/PDF/CMJ142Ep86.pdf

 

 

Marks distribution

  • Quizes: 20%, Mid Term 30%, Final term 40% and Class participation: 10%

IR 725 PhD Course: Security Studies: a panoramic view of the field of security from traditional

concept of power to Critical Security Studies

 

Course outline                                                                                                                                                                 

This course is intended for graduate students and will be methodologically treated as a seminar course with active participation of graduate students of PhD IR program. Security has become a much contested concept and everything associated with violence from criminal gangs to the holocausts of nuclear warfare al come under the ambit of security. Basically there are three main problems associated with the contested nature of security, one relates to its ontological part, that what encompasses its nature, is it material, ideational or philosophical basis which should be the referent of our security?  The second relates to its epistemological orientation that is how we can study it and here the conceptual maze around it thickens as from rational understanding to its socially constructed nature, critical understandings and to game theory, models of deterrence etc, everything comes around. Finally, its contested nature is also due to disciplinary problems especially in the aftermath of rapidly advancing global environmental patterns. Security has now become the concern of everyone and very discipline be it economics, environment, sociology, cosmology, psychology, natural sciences or anything else is eager to have a say in the security paradigm. This is why the security paradigm is fast losing its anchorage in International Relations and has become the mouth piece of everyone. Now the question is how to study it and what to study in it? In this course we will follow the trajectory of security in International Relations and will give due deference to its diversity without following a theoretical straitjacket, further more while respecting all nuances of security we will being out key concepts around which the security concept revolves in International relations. I am giving a list of readings too.

Assessment Criterion:

All participants will participate in seminar discussion in this course, have to submit book reviews of classical text books and article reviews in all classes with a unique critique of their own and it has a bearing of 20 marks. In addition to this we have four quizzes carrying a cumulative score of 20. Taking quizzes will be mandatory and there will be no rescheduling in any case. The mid-term Exam will carry 30 marks and the final term exam will carry 30 marks.

Brief list of areas to be covered

1. Theoretical Approaches

In this aspect we will be covering the concept of security as discussed in both the traditional as well as Critical approaches which includes Realism, Liberalism, Constructivism, critical theory, Feminism, Post-structuralism, Securitization, English school, post-colonialism, International Political economy and security.

 

 

2. Key concepts in Security

There are certain core concepts in security which are very integral to its understanding, in this regard we will discuss concepts like Uncertainty, polarity, war, culture, Coercion, Peace and Violence, Human Security, The Responsibility to Protect, Development.

3. Key Contemporary Challenges

Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity, Ethnic Conflict, Terrorism, Counterterrorism, Counterinsurgency, Intelligence, International Arms Tarde, migration and Refugees, Energy Security, Cyber security, Energy Security, Environmental security, Health security

4. Simulation Exercises

Here groups will be made to defend policies of major actors involved in world conflicts and simulation exercises will be carried out after taking a definitive theoretical stand coupled with empirical understanding of policies of actors involved in these conflicts.

 

Core books: the first two are compulsory reading while the rest are supplementary books

  1. Security Studies An Introduction Third Edition Edited by Paul. D Williams and Amtt McDonald, Routledge, New York, 2018
  2. Routledge Handbook of Security Studies, Edited by Dunn Cavelty and Thierry Balzacq, Routledge, New York, 2017
  3. Contemporary Security Studies”, Fourth Edition, by Allan Collins, Oxford University Press, 2016.
  1. International Security Studies: Theory and Practice by Peter Hough at al, Routledge, New York, 2015
  2. 5.      Security Community in South Asia: India-Pakistan” by Muhammad Shoaib Pervez, Routledge, 2013

Selected Readings

  1. Gilpin (1996) No One loves a Political realist, Security studies 5(3); 3-26
  2. Jervis (1978) Cooperation Under the Security Dilemma, World Politics, Vol. 30, No. 2 (Jan., 1978), pp. 167-214
  3. The Security Dilemma Revisited Author(s): Charles L. Glaser Source: World Politics, Vol. 50, No. 1, Fiftieth Anniversary Special Issue (Oct., 1997), p 171-201
  4. Idealist Internationalism and the Security Dilemma Author(s): John H. Herz Source: World Politics, Vol. 2, No. 2 (Jan., 1950), pp. 157-180
  5. Realists as Optimists: Cooperation as Self-Help Author(s): Charles L. Glaser Source: International Security, Vol. 19, No. 3 (Winter, 1994-1995), pp. 50-90
  1. J. David Singer, "The Level-of-Analysis Problems in International Relations," in Klaus Knorr and Sidney Verba, eds., The International System, pp. 77-92 (also published in World Politics, vol. 14, October 1961).
  2. Graham Allison, "Conceptual Models and the Cuban Missile Crisis," American Political Science Review, vol. 63, September 1969, pp. 689-718,
    or Jonathan Bendor and Thomas Hammond, "Rethinking Allison's Models," APSR, vol. 86, June 1992, pp. 301-22.
  3. Alexander Wendt, "The Agent-Structure Problem in International Relations Theory," International Organization, vol. 41, Summer 1987, pp. 35-73.
  4. Scott Sagan, "Why Do States Build Nuclear Weapons? Three Models in Search of a Bomb," International Security, vol. 21, Winter 1996/97, pp. 54-86.
  5. Robert Gilpin, "No One Loves a Political Realist," Security Studies, vol. 5, Spring 1996, pp. 3-26.
  6. Kenneth Waltz, "Realist Thought and Neorealist Theory," Journal of International Affairs, vol. 44, Spring 1990, pp. 21-37. (Also in Robert Rothstein, ed. The Evolution of Theory on International Relations.)
  7. Stephen Krasner, "State Power and the Structure of International Trade," World Politics, vol. 28, April 1976, pp. 317-48.
  8. D. Scott Bennett, "Security, Bargaining, and the End of Interstate Rivalry," International Studies Quarterly, vol. 40, June 1996, pp. 157-84.
  9. William Wohlforth, "Realism and the End of the Cold War," International Security, vol. 19, Winter 1994/95, pp. 91-129.
  10. Barry Buzan, Charles Jones, and Richard Little, The Logic of Anarchy, pp. 66-80, 119-54.
  11. . Ann Tickner, Gender in International Relations, chapters 1-2, 5.
  12. Paul Schroeder, "Historical Reality versus Neorealist Theory," International Security, vol. 19, Summer 1994, pp. 108-48.
  13. John Mearsheimer, "The False Promise of International Institutions," International Security, vol. 19, Winter 1995/96, pp. 5-49.
  14. "Promises, Promises: Can Institutions Deliver?" (replies to Mearsheimer), International Security, vol. 20, Summer 1995, pp. 39-93.
  15. John Gaddis, "International Relations Theory and the End of the Cold War," International Security, vol. 17, Winter 1992/93, pp. 5-58.
  16. Randall Schweller, "Bandwagoning for Profit: Bringing the Revisionist State Back In," International Security, vol. 19, Summer 1994, pp. 72-107.
  17. Paul Kennedy, The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers, pp. xv-xxv.
  18. Douglas Lemke and Jacek Kugler, "The Evolution of the Power Transition Perspective" and John Vasquez, "When Are Power Transitions Dangerous?" both in Jacek Kugler and Douglas Lemke, eds., Parity and War.
  19. R. Harrison Wagner, "The Theory of Games and the Balance of Power," World Politics, vol. 38, July l968, pp. 546-76.
  20. Hedley Bull, "Society and Anarchy in International Relations," in Herbert Butterfield and Martin Wight, eds., Diplomatic Investigations, pp. 35-50.
  21. Jervis, Perception and Misperception in International Politics, pp. 62-90.
  22. Jervis, "Cooperation Under the Security Dilemma," World Politics, January 1978.
  23. Robert Axelrod, The Evolution of Cooperation, chs. 2 and 9.
  24. Helen Milner, "The Assumption of Anarchy in International Relations Theory: A Critique," Review of International Studies, vol. 17, January 1991, pp. 67-85.
  25. Alexander Wendt, "Anarchy is What States Make of It," International Organization, vol. 46, Spring 1992, pp. 391-426.
  26. Helen Milner, "International Theories of Cooperation Among Nations: Strengths and Weaknesses," World Politics, vol. 44, April 1992, pp. 466-96.
  27. Jervis, "Realism, Game Theory, and Cooperation," World Politics, vol. 40, April 1988, pp. 317-49.
  28. Robert Keohane, After Hegemony, chapters 1, 6, 7.
  29. Lucian Pye, "Political Culture Revisited," Political Psychology, vol. 12, September 1991, pp. 487-508.
  30. Jeffrey Legro, "Culture and Preferences in the International Cooperation Two-Step," APSR, vol. 90, March 1996, pp. 118-37.
  31. Peter Haas, "Regimes and Epistemic Communities," International Organization, vol. 44, Summer 1989, pp. 377-403.
  32. Judith Goldstein and Robert Keohane, eds., Ideas and Foreign Policy, chapters 1 (Goldstein and Keohane), 3 (Ikenberry), 6 (Sikkink).
  33. Robert Jervis, "Ideas and Foreign Policy," unpublished MS.
  34. Edward Rhodes, "Sea Change: Inerest-Based vs. Cultural-Cognitive Accounts of Strategic Choice in the 1890s," Strategic Studies, vol. 5, Summer 1996, pp. 73-124.
  35. Martha Finnemore, "Constructing Norms of Humanitarian Intervention," in Peter Katzenstein, ed., The Culture of National Security, chapter 5.
  36. Robert Herman, "Identity, Norms, and National Security: The Soviet Foreign Policy Revolution and the End of the Cold War," in Katzenstein, ed., Culture of National Security, chapter 8.
  37. Hosoya Chihiro, "Miscalculations in Deterrence Policy: Japanese-
  38. Neil Smelser, "The Rational Choice Perspective," Rationality and Society, vol. 4, October 1992, pp. 381-410.
  39. Samuel Popkin, The Rational Peasant, pp. 1-31.
  40. Thomas Schelling, "What is Game Theory?" in Schelling, Choice and Consequence, pp. 213-42 (skim after page 229).
  41. David Kreps, Game Thoery and Economic Modelling.
  42. James Fearon, "Rationalist Explanations for War," International Organization, vol. 49, Summer 1995, pp. 379-414.
  43. Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, The War Trap, chapter 3.
  44. Robert Jervis, "Rational Deterrence: Theory and Evidence," World Politics, vol. 41, January 1989, pp. 143-207.
  45. George Downs, "The Rational Deterrence Debate," World Politics, vol. 41, January 1989, pp. 225-38.
  1. Baldwin (1997) The concept of security, Review of International studies 23(1): 5-26
  2. Walt (1991) The Renaissance of security Studies, International Studies Quarterly 35(2): 211-39
  3. Strategic culture reconceptualized: the case of India and the BJP MS Pervez, International Politics 56 (1), 87-102
  4. The association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN): a galactic security community? MS Pervez South East Asia Research 27 (2), 182-195
  5. The normative structure of the European union: a constructivist analysis MS Pervez Journal of European Studies 34

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

           

 

           

           

 

 

 

 

           

 

           

           

           

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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